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badge2Care and treatment of acquired and traumatic brain injury must address wide array of cognitive, emotional, behavioral, and physical symptoms.

Grieving Losses after a Brain Injury

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Grieving is a deep sadness that we try to avoid, it is an anguish in your heart that words really can’t touch or describe. But, I know from experience that grieving is necessary and must be embraced when there has been a loss in your life.

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Cognitive Rehabilitation for Children and Youth with Brain Injury

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Cognitive rehabilitation for children and youth with brain injuries (tbi) must address the developmental impact of brain trauma as the child matures. Children with traumatic brain injuries have unique needs for treatment and cognitive rehabilitation that are different from adults with brain injuries.

Children and youth with acquired brain injuries are less likely to receive inpatient rehabilitation than adults. School becomes the setting for cognitive rehabilitation for students with brain injuries. Consequently, families and educators become the long term providers of educational services and rehabilitation supports in local schools and the community.

The student with a brain injury will have changing educational needs as the latent effects of trauma to the brain emerge over time. So it is important for families and educators to work together as partners to identify and meet the needs of children and youth with brain injuries.

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Forensic Case Management after Brain Injury

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Case managers and attorneys working together can help persons with brain injury The relationship between case managers and attorneys show the benefits of using case management in a personal injury claim, such as a traumatic or acquired brain injury or some other catastrophic condition. It explains the role of case managers in hospitals, insurance companies, rehabilitation programs, and legal practice. Case managers act as liaisons, advocates, and negotiators to assist in life care planning.

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Stress, PTSD and Mental Health of Veterans and Soldiers

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Symptoms ranging from mild anxiety to post traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) are being seen in veterans. Depression, alcohol abuse, anger, and difficulty concentrating have been reported by returning troops from Iraq. Seeking mental health treatment carries a negative stigma that results in many veterans and service members denying symptoms, avoiding comrades, and delaying treatment. Stereotypes about mental illness and barriers to mental health counseling make it even more difficult for service members and veterans to seek support and obtain treatment in the military culture.

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How does TBI affect Children and Adolescents? by Marilyn Lash, M.S.W. and Ron Savage, Ed.D.

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Does a brain injury affect children differently than adults? Yes, unlike the adult, a child’s brain is still developing right up through adolescence. An injury to the brain interrupts this development. A traumatic brain injury is different than a birth disorder or chronic illness. The age when the child is injured affects recovery as the brain matures. Special education services can help students with TBI learn and progress in school.

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Traumatic Brain Injury and Concussion in Veterans

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Many veterans have undiagnosed brain injuries or concussions from blasts and explosions. Some soldiers have had multiple concussions. This free article lists the common symptoms of brain injury and gives tips for healing and managing symptoms. Veterans and soldiers with these symptoms should be evaluated for concussion and blast injury to receive early treatment and to help recovery.

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Overlooking Mild Traumatic Brain Injury Concussion

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Concussion is the most common type of traumatic brain injury in adults. Concussion symptoms can include headaches, dizziness, trouble sleeping and difficulty concentrating. Mild traumatic brain injury is a “hidden” condition because too often it is not diagnosed by medical professionals. Many individuals are unaware that their brain has been injured and do not see a doctor or go to an emergency department. Most symptoms are temporary but some adults have long term effects with post concussion syndrome.

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Blast Injuries and Concussions in Veterans

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Blasts and explosions are major causes of brain injuries in soldiers injured in Iraq and Afghanistan. Concussion or mild brain injury is often not diagnosed since there is no loss of consciousness and soldiers return to duty. Post traumatic stress disorders (PTSD) have been diagnosed among soldiers and veterans exposed to combat stress who have returned home.

The severity of a brain injury ranges from very minor concussion to extremely severe brain trauma. Service members are exposed to additional damage from the blast’s impact. They can be thrown or propelled by the blast, be burned and inhale toxic substances.

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Children with Brain Injury: Recovery and School

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Recovery from brain injury is a long process for families and schools. An injury to a child’s brain is a physical and emotional trauma. Changing symptoms – a neurocognitive stall – may appear over a year after the brain injury. Students have new cognitive challenges in school as the brain recovers and learning becomes more complex in school. Family training and education of teachers on TBI are essential to help children cope and learn at home and in school.

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Students with Traumatic Brain Injury

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Students returning to school with traumatic brain injuries may have a variety of physical, cognitive, behavioral, social and emotional challenges. Recovery of function is typically enhanced through exposure to enriched environments like the education provided at schools. Just as schools promote learning, recovery after a brain injury is a re-learning process. This is why it is important to provide students with brain injuries access to appropriate supports and services by educators.

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