Category Description:

badge2Care and treatment of acquired and traumatic brain injury must address wide array of cognitive, emotional, behavioral, and physical symptoms.

Reasonable, Responsible, and Realistic Resolutions after TBI by Donna O’Donnell Figurski

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How many promises and resolutions have you kept? Donna Figurski gives tips for tbi survivors, families and caregivers on changing habits for a healthier lifestyle and avoiding the pitfalls of excuses. Wellness is a critical part of rehabilitation and progress and can be built into your daily routine with some adjustments and accommodations.

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Regaining a Sense of Self by Hilary Zayed

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Losing her sense of self may have been the most painful invisible loss after her brain injury. Hilary Zayed explores the meaning of self and the process of “reinvention” of her new self through her artwork as she rebuilt her identity and explored her future and the meaning of survival. Her new book Regaining a Sense of Self describes the process.

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Real-Life Superheroes Do Exist (I’ve Seen Them)! by Kim Thompson

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You don’t have to be superman or superwoman to have special talents or powers. Kim Thompson’s brain injury blog explores what we expect from our superheroes and suggests that survivors of TBI are the most powerful heroes just by facing each new day.

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Healing Power of Journaling by Barbara Stahura, CJF

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Journaling is a method that both survivors of TBI and caregivers can use to cope with the aftermath of brain trauma. Life after brain injury—to yourself or a loved one—can feel as if you’ve been hijacked to an alien planet where nothing feels familiar or makes sense. How can you possibly make meaning or find healing there? Barbara Stahura explains that journaling is one way to express your emotions, explore your options, and examine your life. Simple writing from both your heart and head for just a few minutes several times a week can help you heal and build resilience.

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What I Learned From a Bathtub by Ann Zuccardy

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Ann Zuccardy relates how even a mild brain injury from a simple household accident can change the nature of how one deals with day to day events.

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Teens and Concussion: More Than Meets the Eye by Phil Hossler, ATC

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As sport becomes more of a fixture in the lives of Americans, the burden of responsibility falls on the shoulders of the various organizations, coaches, parents, clinicians, officials, and researchers to provide an environment that minimizes the risk of injury.

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Heartfelt Support for Family Caregivers by Barbara Stahura, CJF

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Family caregivers face multiple emotional and physical demands. This article shares the experiences of two families who faced these challenges from the TBI suffered by their veteran spouse. Hearts of Valor is one organization providing support for family caregivers dealing with the effects of TBI and PTSD in wounded veterans.

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HBOT: A Way to Heal the Injured Brain? by Barbara Stahura

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HBOT is used to treat brain injury from trauma or another cause such as stroke. While the number of people who have used HBOT for brain injury is unknown, its popularity is growing. When a trauma occurs, the brain often swells, so the injured tissue does not receive enough oxygen. The area that needs the most oxygen gets the least. HBOT drives oxygen into the cerebrospinal fluid, which carries it to the brain and permits healing.

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Adjustment and Acceptance after Brain Injury – Really? By Marilyn Lash

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What do adjustment and acceptance really mean? How does a person and family really adjust to living with a brain injury? How do they accept the changes in the person and for all their lives. Too frequently, adjustment and acceptance are discussed as though they are the final destinations for recovery after brain injury. How many of you who have survived a brain injury have been told, “You just have to adjust to the changes and go on with your life.” Or “Stop fighting it and accept the fact that you are different now.”

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Why Are So Many Veterans Homeless? by Shad Meshad

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The VA estimates more than 300,000 veterans are homeless on any given night. Shad Meshad explores why “homelessness is the last stop on this PTSD/TBI train ride, not the first.” Since the symptoms of PTSD and TBI are similar and often overlap, PTSD can be the initial incorrect or incomplete diagnosis where TBI is present. Both these conditions can manifest as depression, anxiety, sleeplessness, irritability, aggression, and increasing social isolation. But TBI can also include memory loss, migraines, seizures, problems with language, and trouble making what might seem like simple decisions. Vets with brain injury need different treatment.

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