Category Description:

badge2Care and treatment of acquired and traumatic brain injury must address wide array of cognitive, emotional, behavioral, and physical symptoms.

Behavior Management in School for a Student with a Brain Injury by Katherine A. Kimes, Ed.D., CBIS

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Changes in behavior after a brain injury can result in problems in the classroom for the student, along with frustration and confusion not only for the student but for teachers and parents as well. Dr. Katherine Kimes explains the importance of person-centered approaches for effective behavior management techniques. She provides examples of the antecedent-behavior-consequence approach, commonly known as the A-B-C Model of benavior management. Her behavioral checklist will help educators and therapists develop educational and behavioral plans for students with brain injuries.

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Domino Effects of TBI and PTSD by Marilyn Lash, MSW

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The combined effects of TBI and PTSD are like a game of dominoes. Unlike the simple matching of dots on rectangles, it’s the cascade of symptoms affecting cognition, anxiety, depression, alcohol use, and memory that are like the chain of dominoes crashing into disorder. Using the example of sleep disorders due to TBI and PTSD, Marilyn Lash describes how it’s not as simple as a bad night’s sleep but is rather a complex interplay of TBI and PTSD that affects not only the wounded veteran but the family as well.

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Runaway Spending after Brain Injury by Thomas Henson Jr. and Carol Svec

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Impulsive spending, poor judgement and cognitive impairments mean that brain injury finances can spiral out of control leading to financial disaster for TBI survivors. Thomas Henson and Carol Svec share legal advice and steps that families can take to protect survivors from financial ruin.

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Healing Power of the Mind for Veteran by Barbara Stahura

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Meditation helped Bill Roper, a veteran of Vietnam, deal with a serious brain injury and PTSD. Using the power of his mind, he learned how to turn a catastrophic injury and experience into a journey of healing and self discovery. His perspective and experience may be helpful to veterans now returning from Iraq and Afghanistan. The wars are different from Vietnam but the effects on wounded warriors have much in common. Today, Roper believes that his “catastrophic experience had allowed me to discover this awesome power within me.” He stresses that this same power is available to everyone. “It’s really the power of all creation.”

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Ambiguous Loss Wounds Veterans and Family by Marilyn Lash, MSW

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Ambiguous loss can not be seen but it is real and felt by combat veterans, their families and caregivers who struggle with the invisible wounds of war. The story of a World War 2 veteran Louis Zamperini illustrates how even the most strong willed and courageous combat veteran found another war at home with chronic PTSD that almost destroyed him. How much has changed with our returning veterans today?

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My New Normal After Concussion by Madelyn Uretsky

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After a severe concussion playing in her high school soccer game, Madeline Uretsky found herself still suffering from symptoms two years later. It affected every aspect of her life – her studies, friendships, family, and hopes for her future. She has learned to live with this “new normal” but often cannot do things that normal teenagers do, like going to the mall, movies, concerts, sporting events, stores, restaurants, or crowded places. Her experience has led her to educating students and athletes about concussion and advocacy for greater awareness.

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Sports and Concussion – Where Young Brains Need Time to Develop by Phil Hossler, ATC

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Sports and concussion carry special risks for children and adolescents because their brains are still developing. Athletic trainer Phil Hossler shares data on sports concussions in school age children and discusses why it is critical for athletes, coaches, parents, educators and school nurses to become informed. The impact of a concussion can extend far beyond the playing field to the classroom and home. Only by early diagnosis and careful management can athletes and students receive the rest, supports and accommodations that may be needed.

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Executive Skills after Brain Injury in Children and Teens by Janet Tyler, Ph.D.

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Students with TBI often have injuries to their frontal lobes causing changes in their executive skills after brain injury. This can make it harder for them to initiate activities, plan and prioritize, organize their work, problem solve, and control impulses. Getting through the day at school and completing homework at home can be a struggle. Dr. Janet Tyler explains how specific classroom strategies can help these students learn more effectively and improve their executive skills after brain injury.

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Mental Health Challenges across the USA in 2017?

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Mental Health challenges every state in the US. Find data and spending for your state and compare with others. Just click on any state and see the figures.

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My Issues Become the Paper’s Issues: Why I Write Now by Matthew Brown

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Writing got me in touch with my emotions after I came home from Iraq. Through writing about my life during my time in the Marine Corps and after, I started to get in touch with the deep down, raw emotions of the darkest corners of my mind. They truly scared me, and I really did not know what to do with them. With encouragement from my wife and some pushing from Melanie, I started to express these emotions on paper, in ways I never had before. The power of releasing those emotions was amazing. I started to feel the stress of the hard times in my life beginning to fade. They never will go away, because they are part of me, but they started to fade. I just started writing, and my writing became free form poetry.

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