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badge2Care and treatment of acquired and traumatic brain injury must address wide array of cognitive, emotional, behavioral, and physical symptoms.

Brain Injury Awareness Month

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I find it uncomfortable to have only one month to be aware of something. Be aware of Black History in February, and then put it away. Be aware of Brain Injury in March, and then put it away. I’ve heard someone mention one Disability Awareness Week in March. Only one week? That’s not enough. And during my month? That’s too much.

Life isn’t like that. We don’t get to put ourselves away, and why would we want to?

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You Sent Me Paperwork… Now What Am I Supposed to do With It?

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I was a schoolteacher who had an accident on a field trip two years ago. I suffered a mild traumatic brain injury. As a result, I have been faced with some challenges, which used to be my strengths, such as organization, sequencing, math skills, attention, and fatigue. Just to name a few. As I been on my journey, I have learned that I am not alone in my challenges.

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Back to School Time… Reeducating a Damaged Brain

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No one really likes to think about brain damage.

Sure, around these parts, we talk a lot in initials. TBI, ABI, MTBI, EEG, PTSD, MRI… the list goes on.

But the reality in my world is that when I sustained a traumatic brain injury, I experienced brain damage. There is no way to candy coat this harsh reality of what happened. I was struck while cycling, broke bones, tore tendon and ligaments, bruised in places I never knew possible, and I sustained brain damage.

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Traumatic Brain Injury Injustices by David Grant

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Sitting across from my dad last Sunday at a local eatery, he shared something that caught my ear. “The principal of our elementary school was just fired,” he said as casually as if talking about the weather.

He went on to say that she had a recent skiing accident, hit her head, and was having trouble with her memory. Students names now escaped her. Teachers she had known and work with daily were also among the unremembered. And the town took action; action in the from of termination.

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Journey of Reflection

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An old man was walking down a long, lonely road one day on a journey he knew must soon come to an end. As the days passed slowly by, his mind was reflecting upon his journey thus far. There have been many trying times and a lot of uncertainties along the way, but there were many happy and joyous times as well.

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Now School after Brain Injury

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Towards the end of the summer, I started to think about how my first day back at school would be with my brain injury aka the “invisible injury”, and how the year would go in general. Would I be able to make it through my first class? A whole school day? Do homework after school? Have a regular social life? Keep up with my schoolwork? There were so many things to consider and think about upon my return. I had missed a year of school and still had a brain injury. This was going to be a challenge.

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Effective Service Coordination for Students with Acquired Brain Injury or ABI in School

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Coordinating services in school for a student with an acquired or traumatic brain injury can be challenging. Changes in a student’s physical well-being, cognition, emotional and psychosocial behaviors after a traumatic (TBI) or acquired brain injury (ABI) can stigmatize the child in school. Building a foundation to support the student in school requires a team effort with school administrators, community leaders, youths and families. Collaborative communication is essential to effectively address the specific needs of the student with an acquired brain injury. Training, support, and technical assistance for school staff can be a critical factor in effective educational programming.

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PTSD: Not Just A Military Disorder Anymore

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Post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) has become commonly, and for all intents and purposes, unfairly associated with war. A dark, mysterious symptom reserved only for those who have, “seen things” on the battlefield. For the men and women who have experienced such traumatic incidents during a deployment, or suffered severe injuries due to combat related incidents, it is not uncommon to develop PTSD. However, it is equally as common for civilians, or every-day Joe’s to experience symptoms of PTSD due to orthopedic trauma, like those one might experience during a serious vehicle accident.

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Practical Caregiving Tips To Advocate For Your Hospitalized Brain Injury Patient – Part 3

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This article is part three of a three part series that will help you step into an advocacy role for your brain injury patient, feel more confident about your role as a caregiver, and communicate effectively with medical professionals. These tips and actions are practical and provide real life advice to help you navigate through the countless tests, doctors, nurses, therapists, medicines and other medical professionals and new terminology. Moving forward, accept that you have a steep learning curve and apply yourself persistently.

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How to Help a Friend with a Concussion

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Your buddy or teammate or family member has sustained a concussion. Maybe you don’t believe it. Maybe she doesn’t believe it. Listen up: BELIEVE IT. There is no way to prove that someone has had a concussion. The only way for her to recover quickly and fully is to Rest.

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