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badge2Care and treatment of acquired and traumatic brain injury must address wide array of cognitive, emotional, behavioral, and physical symptoms.

Practical Caregiving Tips to Advocate For Your Brain Injury Patient – Part 2

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This article is part two of a three part series that will help you step into an advocacy role for your loved one with a Traumatic Brain Injury, feel more confident about your role as a caregiver, and communicate effectively with medical professionals. These tips and actions are practical and provide real life advice to help you navigate through the countless tests, doctors, nurses, therapists, medicines and other medical professionals and new terminology. Moving forward, accept that you have a steep learning curve and apply yourself persistently.

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Why Mince Words? PTSD Sucks.

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Just like there are a myriad of flavors of ice cream, so it is with Post traumatic Stress Disorder. No two cases are alike. Unlike so many, I can bike by the exact spot where my soul was bruised in a cacophony of broken glass, twisted metal and wailing rescue vehicles… I can pass that exact spot, and do several times a week, without any real issue. Sure, there are still times I bike up Granite Ave and think to myself, “this is where I experienced the last few minutes of a life I now mostly forget.”

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Advocate For Your Traumatic Brain Injury Hospitalized Patient

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A Traumactic Brain Injury patient is rarely able to advocate for themselves and it’s important that family and friends know how to help properly. If your family member is to be in the hospital or rehab due to a brain injury for a lengthy stay there are some things that you can do to make the time less difficult. These tips are simple and non-intrusive. Also, when you have multiple family caregivers it’s essential to record the conversations of the medical professionals so that you know of any changes to medications, additional tests that were given and keep up to date on changes in the patient’s behavior. Tracking and sharing that information is the purpose of The Caregiver’s Journal.

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MTBI & PTSD – Living with a Traumatic Brain Injury by David Grant

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I watched her sleep today. Always the first one up in the morning, my brain often waking up an hour or more before I do, today I had the luxury of not jumping tight out of bed.

And she was smiling in her sleep.

And I was glad… glad that she was able to find a measure of peace away from the daily challenges of life.

We’ve all heard that old saying about a picture being worth a thousand words. But looks can indeed be quite deceiving. A face smiling back at you as you look at a picture tells you so little. Rather than a using picture to tell the tale, today I opt for the Thousand Words.

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Is Brain Injured, Brain Damaged?

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Mike Strand reflects on how words such as brain damaged, brain injured, disabled, or crippled send powerful messages about the value of the individual. Survivor and recovery are also used freely but what do they really mean for the person who is living with a brain injury. As a survivor and a person who has lived with a brain injury since 1989, Mike Strand shares his perspective and personal views on the words that he chooses to use to describe his life.

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Journal after Brain Injury – Tips and topics for journaling

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Whether you’re living with your own brain injury or are a family caregiver, you can benefit from writing your thoughts and feelings for just a few minutes a couple of times a week. It helps to have some good techniques available both to help you start a writing session and to broaden your journaling practice to make it more satisfying and productive. Some of these techniques are the Unsent Letter, Perspectives, Captured Moment, and Dialogue.

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Writing Challenges Executive Functions of TBI Students in School

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As students with traumatic brain injury or TBI move to middle and high school, the executive skills of the brain’s frontal lobe face more complex challenges. These areas are often damaged in moderate or severe brain injuries. Theresa Sacchi Armstrong describes why writing assignments can be especially difficult for these students with TBI in school and how teachers can help.

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Embracing Your New Self after Brain Injury

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Amanda Nachman was an elementary schoolteacher for fifteen years prior to her mild traumatic brain injury in 2011. She is still working on her recovery, and writing to share her story to get the word out that not only athletes and soldiers are dealing with this invisible disability, but people we come across every day can be affected by the impact concussions can have on us. She is hoping she can help change the way the medical field responds to others who find themselves in a similar situation.

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Educating Students with Brain Injury (TBI): The Big Picture for Schools

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Students with traumatic brain injury or TBI are often unidentified or underserved in schools as this diagnosis is still mistakenly considered a low incidence disability under special education. Dr. Katherine Kimes looks beyond the individual needs of students with TBI and discusses the “big picture” of why schools need to address this student population more effectively. She explains why parents and teachers must jointly plan and collaborate to provide effective service coordination for a student with a TBI.

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Even Teachers Get Concussions by Amanda Nachman

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Amanda Nachman was an elementary schoolteacher for fifteen years prior to her mild traumatic brain injury in 2011. She is still working on her recovery, and writing to share her story to get the word out that not only athletes and soldiers are dealing with this invisible disability, but people we come across every day can be affected by the impact concussions can have on us. She is hoping she can help change the way the medical field responds to others who find themselves in a similar situation.

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