Category Description:

Post traumatic stress (PTS) was formerly called post traumatic stess disorder (PTSD). It is often seen in service members and veterans exposed to blast injuries but can also occur in civilians hurt in car crashes, natural disasters and other life threatening events. These blogs on traumatic stress provide information on the signs and symptoms of PTSD, treatment options, and support for individuals, families and caregivers.

Let’s Not Forget our Wounded Veterans as Time Passes

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As our service members and veterans come home, the invisible wounds of TBI and PTSD can have serious consequences for families. The new war at home is less recognized than the conflicts on the battlefield. The troops on the home front are the spouses, parents, children and siblings. Let us not forget them as time passes. There is no expiration date on the effects of war. There are struggles and conflicts that will endure long after service members come home and we need to remember that and reach out to help and support them.

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PTSD: Not Just A Military Disorder Anymore

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Post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) has become commonly, and for all intents and purposes, unfairly associated with war. A dark, mysterious symptom reserved only for those who have, “seen things” on the battlefield. For the men and women who have experienced such traumatic incidents during a deployment, or suffered severe injuries due to combat related incidents, it is not uncommon to develop PTSD. However, it is equally as common for civilians, or every-day Joe’s to experience symptoms of PTSD due to orthopedic trauma, like those one might experience during a serious vehicle accident.

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Why Mince Words? PTSD Sucks.

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Just like there are a myriad of flavors of ice cream, so it is with Post traumatic Stress Disorder. No two cases are alike. Unlike so many, I can bike by the exact spot where my soul was bruised in a cacophony of broken glass, twisted metal and wailing rescue vehicles… I can pass that exact spot, and do several times a week, without any real issue. Sure, there are still times I bike up Granite Ave and think to myself, “this is where I experienced the last few minutes of a life I now mostly forget.”

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MTBI & PTSD – Living with a Traumatic Brain Injury by David Grant

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I watched her sleep today. Always the first one up in the morning, my brain often waking up an hour or more before I do, today I had the luxury of not jumping tight out of bed.

And she was smiling in her sleep.

And I was glad… glad that she was able to find a measure of peace away from the daily challenges of life.

We’ve all heard that old saying about a picture being worth a thousand words. But looks can indeed be quite deceiving. A face smiling back at you as you look at a picture tells you so little. Rather than a using picture to tell the tale, today I opt for the Thousand Words.

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Getting Help for PTSD is a Step Forward for Veterans

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“Admitting that you have an issue with PTSD isn’t a sign of weakness. It is a sign that you are truly a strong person. Actively seeking a treatment plan or someone to talk with can be one of the most difficult things to do in your life, but it also can be one of the most rewarding.” These are the words of Matt Brown who knows first hand how hard it can be to ask for help.

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A Retreat for Wounded Warriors and Their Families – Making a Difference

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A retreat for Wounded Warriors, led by Tim and Shannon Maxwell, addresses the wounds of war by creating a network of support and information for veterans and their wives. Aptly titled, Meeting of the Minds, Bob Cluett reflects on the unique bonds among Wounded Warriors and the importance of the team and the unit for Marines. Hosted by SemperMax, this grass roots organization is composed of Marines and veterans who are committed to supported Wounded Warriors through the challenges of treatment and recovery as they rebuild their lives and futures.

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Is PTSD a Disorder or Injury for Veterans?

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Many wives of wounded warriors have commented that too much of the attention on post-traumatic stress disorder or PTSD in our veterans and service members focuses on its negative aspects and not enough attention is given to effective treatment and progress. The American Psychiatric Associate is debating whether to officially change the wording from “disorder” to “injury” which might lessen the stigma associated with mental health treatment. For those wives who live with the fall-out from PTSD on a daily basis, Marshele Waddell offers an alternative name for PTSD that offers hope and progress.

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Voices of Wives of Wounded Warriors

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Now caregivers as well as wives and mothers, many women are finding that the effects of traumatic brain injury (TBI) and post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) have changed not only their husbands but their entire family. As these women speak out about the changes in their marriages, parenting, and relationship, it becomes clear that the emotional trauma of war affects every member in the family as the wounded warrior comes home.

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TBI and PTSD – Is there a difference?

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The symptoms and changes caused by traumatic brain injury (TBI) and post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) are both similar and different. It can be stressful, frustrating, and difficult for family, spouses, and caregivers to know which condition is causing the changes in behavior, emotions or cognition. These invisible wounds are much harder to recognize than the physical changes, but they can be life altering. As wounded warriors return home, their families are struggling to understand their effects. Using an example of erratic driving and road rage, this blog post illustrates the compounded effects of PTSD and TBI.

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TBI and PTSD affects wives as well as service members and veterans

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Weekend retreats help the women and wives of wounded warriors injured in Iraq and Afghanistan explore their own needs for support, help and encouragement as they deal with the emotional trauma as the effects of war come home with their husbands. Marilyn Lash is part of a team conducting retreats across the country and shares what she has learned from these women about the emotional aftermath of wartime injuries on marriage and parenting.

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