Brain and Healing by William Jarvis

ALL TBI SURVIVORS AND CARE GIVERS NEED TO KNOW that improvement is possible, even years later. It always amazes me the amount of healing that can take place in the...

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Can I be Objective and Have Empathy after my Brain Injury?

One thing that has confused me since my TBI is empathy. I want everyone to have it and forgive me when I'm rude, forgetful, and overwhelmed. More than anything, I...

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Magic as Therapy after Brain Injury

Being disabled is not fun! A car collision for me in 2000 resulted in a coma, fractured C1-C4 vertebrae, a Traumatic Brain Injury, and one and a half years...

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Why Bother with Families after Brain Injury?

Writing for families gets little support or recognition in clinical and academic circles. It’s time to rethink biases and disincentives that leave families uninformed and searching for information about brain...

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Finding Purpose In Being a Brain Injury Survivor by Mike Heikes

The autobiography of Brain Injury Survivor and five time cross country charity bicyclist Mike Heikes. Mike formed "helmets For Kids", giving away thousands of free helmets. It tells how Mike...

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The Grip of Anniversaries

As I write this, the calendar says July 5, 2013, but my mind is pulled back to July 5, 1998. That’s because my husband Alan suffered the massive heart attack...

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Janet Cromer Interviewed on Brain Injury Radio

This week I had the pleasure of being a guest of Kim Justus, host of the Recovery Now show, on Brain Injury Radio. Kim is a brain injury survivor and...

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Head Injury: Where the Rubber Meets the Road by Ron Harnett

My wheelbarrow tire suddenly goes flat. With the spring thaw, dirt and debris to be loaded on and carted around, not good timing. What to do? What turns out is a...

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Hi God, it’s me, David – After My Brain Injury! by David Grant

Since my accident, I’ve taken up an interest in nuclear physics. That alone is a bit of an oddity. Most of your Kids don’t realize that all the matter that...

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The Near Normal after Brain Injury

Four years ago, I survived two Mild Traumatic Brain Injuries, one from a car accident in which I was broadsided while idling at a stoplight. My driver’s side and curtain...

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Brain and Healing by William Jarvis

ALL TBI SURVIVORS AND CARE GIVERS NEED TO KNOW that improvement is possible, even years later. It always amazes me the amount of healing that can take place in the...

Read more »

Don’t be discouraged, there is always another bus for a TBI survivor! by William C. Jarvis, Ed.D.

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William Jarvis contrasts the wish of so many TBI survivors for immediate healing with the challenges of living with a brain injury over years and even a lifetime. Struggles for the TBI Survivor can seem endless. It is acquiring the internal strength of patience that can make living with this injury possible. Your mental attitude towards difficulties can make the difference. By learning from failures, becoming persistent, and having patience, life can be meaningful and rewarding.

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Hope after Brain Injury – Never say Never by Jessica Smith

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Brain injury hope – what’s that mean? I’m Jessy. I would like to start off by saying that if anyone has any doubt about if your loved one or even yourself could possibility recover from a brain injury, I’m ecstatic to tell you there’s always a possibility of recovering if you have hope. Without hope, there’s really no recovery. You have to remember that the doctors that you or your loved ones see are smart, but they definitely don’t know everything. You know your limits better than a doctor does and it always helps having support.

I know from experience that a brain injury changes some aspects of your life, but by no means does it define you. I know because I have a TBI (traumatic brain injury).

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You Can Do More Than You Think as a TBI Survivor! by William Jarvis, Ed.D.

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William Jarvis is a TBI survivor who found that moving his home became an analogy for moving forward with his life and not allowing his TBI to limit his future. It’s been 14 years since his brain injury and he still deals with fatigue – both cognitive and physical fatigue. But he has found strategies that recharge him and help him accomplish what he needs to do during the day. While many survivors focus on the challenges and limitations, Jarvis suggests that engagement with life – not the past – is the key to moving forward. Moving his home became an analogy for moving forward with his life.

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New Manual on TBI Hope, A Manual for Emotional Recovery helps Families, Caregivers, and Survivors

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A new manual TBI Hope by Denise Boggs and Debbie A. Leonhardt, M.A. addresses the often neglected aspect of emotional recovery for families, caregivers and survivors. This step-by-step manual gives families essential tools to help them transition into their new life when caring for a family member who had a traumatic brain injury. The process of emotional healing is often overlooked in the medical treatment of TBI but it is essential for families and survivors to rebuild their lives and relationships in the journey of brain injury.

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Sports and Concussion – Where Young Brains Need Time to Develop by Phil Hossler, ATC

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Sports and concussion carry special risks for children and adolescents because their brains are still developing. Athletic trainer Phil Hossler shares data on sports concussions in school age children and discusses why it is critical for athletes, coaches, parents, educators and school nurses to become informed. The impact of a concussion can extend far beyond the playing field to the classroom and home. Only by early diagnosis and careful management can athletes and students receive the rest, supports and accommodations that may be needed.

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Talking with Your Spouse or Charlie Brown’s Teacher? Miscommunication in Couples after Brain Injury by Dawn Neumann, PhD

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Couples after brain injury often find that their relationship changes in many ways, particularly their ability to communicate with each other. One partner often feels frustrated, angry, guilty and even avoids the other. Good communication is the foundation for a good relationship. Without it, relationships are as vulnerable as a house of cards. Miscommunication after a brain injury tends to revolve around the couple’s inability to share and understand each other’s emotions and needs. Dr. Dawn Neumann gives couples strategies on how to communicate more effectively.

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Executive Skills after Brain Injury in Children and Teens by Janet Tyler, Ph.D.

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Students with TBI often have injuries to their frontal lobes causing changes in their executive skills after brain injury. This can make it harder for them to initiate activities, plan and prioritize, organize their work, problem solve, and control impulses. Getting through the day at school and completing homework at home can be a struggle. Dr. Janet Tyler explains how specific classroom strategies can help these students learn more effectively and improve their executive skills after brain injury.

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News Release: SILENT CRIES and TRAVELING FORWARD by Michael Ciafone

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Michael Ciafone has written two books on living with a traumatic brain injury. Silent Cries and Traveling Forward will take you on his journey of faith, hope, and perseverance as he finds meaning in his life once more and travels forward.

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Mental Health Challenges across the USA in 2017?

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Mental Health challenges every state in the US. Find data and spending for your state and compare with others. Just click on any state and see the figures.

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My Issues Become the Paper’s Issues: Why I Write Now by Matthew Brown

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Writing got me in touch with my emotions after I came home from Iraq. Through writing about my life during my time in the Marine Corps and after, I started to get in touch with the deep down, raw emotions of the darkest corners of my mind. They truly scared me, and I really did not know what to do with them. With encouragement from my wife and some pushing from Melanie, I started to express these emotions on paper, in ways I never had before. The power of releasing those emotions was amazing. I started to feel the stress of the hard times in my life beginning to fade. They never will go away, because they are part of me, but they started to fade. I just started writing, and my writing became free form poetry.

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