Brain and Healing by William Jarvis

ALL TBI SURVIVORS AND CARE GIVERS NEED TO KNOW that improvement is possible, even years later. It always amazes me the amount of healing that can take place in the...

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Can I be Objective and Have Empathy after my Brain Injury?

One thing that has confused me since my TBI is empathy. I want everyone to have it and forgive me when I'm rude, forgetful, and overwhelmed. More than anything, I...

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Magic as Therapy after Brain Injury

Being disabled is not fun! A car collision for me in 2000 resulted in a coma, fractured C1-C4 vertebrae, a Traumatic Brain Injury, and one and a half years...

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Why Bother with Families after Brain Injury?

Writing for families gets little support or recognition in clinical and academic circles. It’s time to rethink biases and disincentives that leave families uninformed and searching for information about brain...

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Finding Purpose In Being a Brain Injury Survivor by Mike Heikes

The autobiography of Brain Injury Survivor and five time cross country charity bicyclist Mike Heikes. Mike formed "helmets For Kids", giving away thousands of free helmets. It tells how Mike...

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The Grip of Anniversaries

As I write this, the calendar says July 5, 2013, but my mind is pulled back to July 5, 1998. That’s because my husband Alan suffered the massive heart attack...

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Janet Cromer Interviewed on Brain Injury Radio

This week I had the pleasure of being a guest of Kim Justus, host of the Recovery Now show, on Brain Injury Radio. Kim is a brain injury survivor and...

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Head Injury: Where the Rubber Meets the Road by Ron Harnett

My wheelbarrow tire suddenly goes flat. With the spring thaw, dirt and debris to be loaded on and carted around, not good timing. What to do? What turns out is a...

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Hi God, it’s me, David – After My Brain Injury! by David Grant

Since my accident, I’ve taken up an interest in nuclear physics. That alone is a bit of an oddity. Most of your Kids don’t realize that all the matter that...

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The Near Normal after Brain Injury

Four years ago, I survived two Mild Traumatic Brain Injuries, one from a car accident in which I was broadsided while idling at a stoplight. My driver’s side and curtain...

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Brain and Healing by William Jarvis

ALL TBI SURVIVORS AND CARE GIVERS NEED TO KNOW that improvement is possible, even years later. It always amazes me the amount of healing that can take place in the...

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Preventing and Healing Compassion Fatigue by Janet M. Cromer, RN, LMHC, CCFE

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Compassion fatigue is a form of complete exhaustion that results from the prolonged stress of caring for a very sick or traumatized person. Compassion fatigue depletes our physical, emotional, and spiritual reserves, so interventions must replenish those dimensions. It even interferes with how the body and mind function. Living with this extreme stress is dangerous because it can contribute to medical illness, mood disturbances, behavior changes, and substance abuse. Compassion fatigue builds up slowly as the stress response stays in overdrive for weeks, or even months.

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Modalities For TBI Improvement by William C. Jarvis, Ed.D.

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Traumatic Brain Injury improvement can be maximized when the TBI survivor uses strategies at home. Bill Jarvis has developed specific strategies for the Jarvis Rehabilitation Method that center around different modalities of effort. These modalities are: Speaking-Hearing; Seeing; Feeling; Thinking; Experiencing. He explains how and why these strategies have both direct and indirect benefits for continuing rehabilitation and progress over time.

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Friending with Brain Injury by Cheryl Green

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Social isolation is a huge problem after brain injury. Set like “The Dating Game,” three characters with brain injury attempt to friend each other following the rules of a host who doesn’t get it. Filled with dark comedy, the film opens a dialogue about some very painful parts of reality. This DVD by Cheryl Green is funny, endearing, painful, and insightful – it’s about living with brain injury.

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Cooking with Brain Injury by Cheryl Green and William Alton

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This short film by Cheryl Green infuses humor into daily struggles of life after traumatic brain injury. Cooking with Brain Injury shows how the ordinary task of cooking can become a challenging puzzle for the survivor of a brain injury. True events are shown in style of a network TV cooking show where the cooks are stymied by a piece of salmon and their own unpredictable obstacles.

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Wounded Families in the Aftermath of PTSD: The Invisible Emotional Wounds by Marilyn Lash, M.S.W.

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For so many returning service members and veterans dealing with post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD), the question may be, “Are your emotions ready for intimacy?” Sex and intimacy are very different. While sex is a physical act, intimacy is an emotional connection. loss of intimacy. Tt is the elephant in the room that too often is not discussed with family, friends, physicians, or counselors. When the connection between loss of intimacy and PTSD is not understood, too many partners “take it personally” and feel unloved, unworthy, unattractive, and rejected. Whether the demands for sex are constant or sex is avoided for long periods, loss of intimacy can undermine the very core of a couple’s relationship.

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My Concussion Changed Me By Catz LeBlanc

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Catz LeBlanc describes the impact of a concussion she sustained as a sports injury that was soon after compounded by a car crash leaving her unable to work or function from day to day. Suddenly she was not the competent independent woman she knew but found herself struggling to understand what had happened to her. Losing her friends and family and her job was tough enough, but losing her ability to think clearly and negotiate the cognitive challenges of daily life was devastating. Her reflections and insights about what it means to have a brain injury and the misperceptions of others about “what was wrong with me” have led her to asking many new questions.

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Helping Children with TBI Succeed in School by Janet Tyler, PhD

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Children and adolescents with traumatic brain injury (TBI) often face many cognitive, academic, and behavioral challenges after their injury. New difficulties in school may arise as school work becomes more complex with each passing grade. By working closely with teachers and educators, parents can help ensure that their child has the best possible chance of succeeding in school. Dr. Janet Tyler discusses how parents and teachers can collaborate to learn about brain injury, how good parenting skills at home can make a difference, and the benefits of tutoring. Parents and educators will find this article practical and helpful.

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TBI and PTSD: Navigating the Perfect Storm by Marilyn Lash, M.S.W.

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Traumatic brain injury and post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) are separate conditions but many of their symptoms overlap. It can be hard for the person who is living with the dual diagnosis of TBI and PTSD and for family and caregivers to separate them. Just as meteorologists predict “the perfect storm” when unusual and unprecedented conditions move in to create catastrophic atmospheric events, so can the combination of PTSD and TBI be overpowering and destructive for all in its path. The person with TBI and PTSD is living in a state unlike anything previously experienced. For the family, home may no longer the safe haven but an unfamiliar front with unpredictable and sometimes frightening currents and events. This article describes similarities and differences with PTSD and TBI.

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Brain Injury and Grief: Fact or Fiction? by Janelle Breese Biagioni

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The grief that follows a brain injury often perplexes relatives, friends, and coworkers. After all, if the person survived the brain injury, shouldn’t the reaction be joy, relief and gratitude? Janelle Breese Biagioni explores the meaning of grief and loss after TBI and why mourning is so important for emotional healing.

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The Slow Crawl of Brain Injury Recovery by David Grant

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David Grant describes his journey of brain injury recovery to find a “new normal” after he was broadsided while cycling in 2010. Entering the uncharted territory of specialists and hospitals, his cognitive challenges continued over time and increased his stress and anxiety. New difficulties with speech and memory undermined his sense of self and ability to work, jeopardizing his future. His insights into life as a survivor of a brain injury bring new insights and meaning to his life now.

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