Brain and Healing by William Jarvis

ALL TBI SURVIVORS AND CARE GIVERS NEED TO KNOW that improvement is possible, even years later. It always amazes me the amount of healing that can take place in the...

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Can I be Objective and Have Empathy after my Brain Injury?

One thing that has confused me since my TBI is empathy. I want everyone to have it and forgive me when I'm rude, forgetful, and overwhelmed. More than anything, I...

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Magic as Therapy after Brain Injury

Being disabled is not fun! A car collision for me in 2000 resulted in a coma, fractured C1-C4 vertebrae, a Traumatic Brain Injury, and one and a half years...

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Why Bother with Families after Brain Injury?

Writing for families gets little support or recognition in clinical and academic circles. It’s time to rethink biases and disincentives that leave families uninformed and searching for information about brain...

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Finding Purpose In Being a Brain Injury Survivor by Mike Heikes

The autobiography of Brain Injury Survivor and five time cross country charity bicyclist Mike Heikes. Mike formed "helmets For Kids", giving away thousands of free helmets. It tells how Mike...

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The Grip of Anniversaries

As I write this, the calendar says July 5, 2013, but my mind is pulled back to July 5, 1998. That’s because my husband Alan suffered the massive heart attack...

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Janet Cromer Interviewed on Brain Injury Radio

This week I had the pleasure of being a guest of Kim Justus, host of the Recovery Now show, on Brain Injury Radio. Kim is a brain injury survivor and...

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Head Injury: Where the Rubber Meets the Road by Ron Harnett

My wheelbarrow tire suddenly goes flat. With the spring thaw, dirt and debris to be loaded on and carted around, not good timing. What to do? What turns out is a...

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Hi God, it’s me, David – After My Brain Injury! by David Grant

Since my accident, I’ve taken up an interest in nuclear physics. That alone is a bit of an oddity. Most of your Kids don’t realize that all the matter that...

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The Near Normal after Brain Injury

Four years ago, I survived two Mild Traumatic Brain Injuries, one from a car accident in which I was broadsided while idling at a stoplight. My driver’s side and curtain...

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Brain and Healing by William Jarvis

ALL TBI SURVIVORS AND CARE GIVERS NEED TO KNOW that improvement is possible, even years later. It always amazes me the amount of healing that can take place in the...

Read more »

Mapping New Directions in Caregiving by Janet M. Cromer, RN, MA, LMHC

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Janet Cromer has professional and personal experience as a caregiver. Having survived caring for her husband after his anoxic brain injury, she uses her expertise to help families recognize and manage the stresses and rewards of caregiving, especially when faced with the cognitive, social and behavioral changes that so often accompany a traumatic or acquired brain injury.

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Make Your Life’s Story Better with Journaling by Barbara Stahura

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When Barbara Stahura’s husband Ken was hit on his motorcycle by a hit-and-run driver less than a year after their wedding, she was thrown into the new world of caregiving. With the uncertainty of his prognosis and their future along with the stress of caring for a spouse while learning about traumatic brain injury, she quickly became exhausted. As a professional writer, she began journaling as a method for coping with her stress, anxiety, and grief. Journaling literally became a life saver for her and helped her own healing journey from the secondary traumatic stress known as compassion fatigue. She describes the benefits of journaling and gives tips on getting started.

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Who’s Who in This Family Now by Rosemary Rawlins

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One family life ends and another begins when a spouse, parent, child, or sibling has a brain injury. When traumatic brain injury strikes a family, everybody suffers. Roles flip, responsibilities shift, and stress mounts. Until the extent of the injury is known, and healing begins, remaining family members take on what added responsibilities they can, and learn to do without—without the counsel, connection, and comfort of someone they once relied on. Rosemary Rawlins describes how her family and children made it through the hardest first two years after her husband High’s TBI and gives suggestions on coping.

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Becoming the Healer: The Miracle of Brain Injury by Deborah Schlag

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Becoming-The-Healer.jpgBecoming the Healer: The Miracle of Brain Injury is a book to be read by everyone, not just for understanding the brain injured person. No matter where you are in your life, reading or listening to this story will renew in you hope, faith, and the belief that miracles still happen today and can happen for you too. You will be inspired with great ideas, encouraging you to step out in faith, to let go of your fears, and to make the necessary changes to step into your own miracles.

This was the case with Deborah Schlag who never imagined herself to be given the gift of healing. Now, having experienced a brain injury and the miracles of healing that have brought her full circle in that process she shares to help you do the same.

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You’re Not the Only One – Support for Spouses of TBI Survivors by Casey Bachus

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Casey Bachus shares her loneliness as a spouse after her husband Jeff’s traumatic brain injury and her search to find support and resources. She encourages spouses not to struggle alone with their feelings of loss and abandonment but to reach out to other spouses of TBI to for support and information on this long and uncertain journey of brain injury.

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Surviving Separation and Divorce after TBI by William C. Jarvis, Ed.D.

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A traumatic brain injury can result in so many losses with the physical, social, emotional, behavioral, and financial changes. TBI survivor, Bill Jarvis, shares how his relationship with his wife changed as she became his caregiver. The toll eventually led to their separation and divorce plunging him into despair and grief. Sustained by his faith, he has rebuilt his life and found new meaning. He shares what he has learned with tips for survivors on how to head off a divorce.

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Let’s Not Forget our Wounded Veterans as Time Passes

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As our service members and veterans come home, the invisible wounds of TBI and PTSD can have serious consequences for families. The new war at home is less recognized than the conflicts on the battlefield. The troops on the home front are the spouses, parents, children and siblings. Let us not forget them as time passes. There is no expiration date on the effects of war. There are struggles and conflicts that will endure long after service members come home and we need to remember that and reach out to help and support them.

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Many Layers of Loss after Brain Injury – Grief is like an onion

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Grieving after a brain injury is like peeling an onion. There are many layers. The more you let yourself feel, the more you mourn what has been lost. But how do families grieve when the person has survived a brain injury? As Janelle Breese Biagioni, an expert on grief and loss says, “The only wrong way to grieve is not to grieve.” But so many family members are confused by their feeling of loss and grief – because, after all, the person survived their injury to the brain – shouldn’t they be feeling grateful, relieved, even joyful?

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Brain and Healing by William Jarvis

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ALL TBI SURVIVORS AND CARE GIVERS NEED TO KNOW that improvement is possible, even years later. It always amazes me the amount of healing that can take place in the brain. The brain is always trying to do things in parts that have been injured and even sometimes other parts of the brain take over. This does not mean 100% healing, but it does mean you can be better tomorrow than you are today!!!

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Can I be Objective and Have Empathy after my Brain Injury?

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One thing that has confused me since my TBI is empathy. I want everyone to have it and forgive me when I’m rude, forgetful, and overwhelmed. More than anything, I wish I had it for others. I’m sure I used to have a whole lot more of it.

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