Brain and Healing by William Jarvis

ALL TBI SURVIVORS AND CARE GIVERS NEED TO KNOW that improvement is possible, even years later. It always amazes me the amount of healing that can take place in the...

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Can I be Objective and Have Empathy after my Brain Injury?

One thing that has confused me since my TBI is empathy. I want everyone to have it and forgive me when I'm rude, forgetful, and overwhelmed. More than anything, I...

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Magic as Therapy after Brain Injury

Being disabled is not fun! A car collision for me in 2000 resulted in a coma, fractured C1-C4 vertebrae, a Traumatic Brain Injury, and one and a half years...

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Why Bother with Families after Brain Injury?

Writing for families gets little support or recognition in clinical and academic circles. It’s time to rethink biases and disincentives that leave families uninformed and searching for information about brain...

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Finding Purpose In Being a Brain Injury Survivor by Mike Heikes

The autobiography of Brain Injury Survivor and five time cross country charity bicyclist Mike Heikes. Mike formed "helmets For Kids", giving away thousands of free helmets. It tells how Mike...

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The Grip of Anniversaries

As I write this, the calendar says July 5, 2013, but my mind is pulled back to July 5, 1998. That’s because my husband Alan suffered the massive heart attack...

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Janet Cromer Interviewed on Brain Injury Radio

This week I had the pleasure of being a guest of Kim Justus, host of the Recovery Now show, on Brain Injury Radio. Kim is a brain injury survivor and...

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Head Injury: Where the Rubber Meets the Road by Ron Harnett

My wheelbarrow tire suddenly goes flat. With the spring thaw, dirt and debris to be loaded on and carted around, not good timing. What to do? What turns out is a...

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Hi God, it’s me, David – After My Brain Injury! by David Grant

Since my accident, I’ve taken up an interest in nuclear physics. That alone is a bit of an oddity. Most of your Kids don’t realize that all the matter that...

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The Near Normal after Brain Injury

Four years ago, I survived two Mild Traumatic Brain Injuries, one from a car accident in which I was broadsided while idling at a stoplight. My driver’s side and curtain...

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Brain and Healing by William Jarvis

ALL TBI SURVIVORS AND CARE GIVERS NEED TO KNOW that improvement is possible, even years later. It always amazes me the amount of healing that can take place in the...

Read more »

Family Voices for Brain Injury and PTSD

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Family are direct witnesses to the needs of survivors of blast injury and traumatic brain injury. Their testimony can have an impact that is far greater and more powerful than any data or reports. Anna Freese, Director of Wounded Warrior Project’s (WWP) Family Support Program and liaison to family caregivers, knows this. She has given powerful professional and personal testimony to Congress on the critical support services that families need for our wounded warriors.

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Planning for 2012 after Brain Injury

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As we approach the upcoming year, it is a good time to review the goals we set out for ourselves in 2011. These may include rehabilitation goals, educational, employment or lifestyle (weight) goals. How did you finish up? Did you achieve them all? Are some still incomplete? Were some goals completely off the charts and no matter how hard you tried, they stayed out of your reach? Some goals, like rehabilitation goals may be ongoing so when examining how you did, look at progress, not necessarily completion.

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Poem: Look Back, Move Forward

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If hope seems futile and it’s hard To Be

Look back and you will see

How far you’ve come from months gone by

When you were blind and did not know just what to do.

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Journaling – Your Story Matters

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Why? Because the best way to understand brain injury is to know what it does to people—survivors and family caregivers alike—and how it changes their lives. For instance, an injury to the frontal lobes can harm cognitive functions such as planning, working memory, attention, inhibition, problem solving, initiation, and monitoring one’s actions. Knowing that from a medical standpoint is necessary. Yet that might not make much impact until you know that such an injury can prevent a person from working, which means the loss of a home to the survivor and her young children. Where do they go now? How will they survive? This woman’s story matters not only to her and her family, but also to society.

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Don’t you just Hate it!

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Don’t you just hate it when you are treated like you are not ‘intelligent’ enough by someone, or that you do not know what it is you are talking about–especially when you not only KNOW but LIVE the very thing you ARE talking about!?

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Barbara Stahura and Journaling

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Barbara Stahura, Certified Journal Facilitator, discovered the power of personal journaling years ago and now shares her knowledge in workshops that provide pathways to personal growth and self-empowerment. Her book, After Brain Injury: Telling Your Story, grew from her long-running journaling group in Tucson, AZ. She has also facilitated journaling events for the National Guard, family caregivers, writers, equine-facilitated experiential learning groups, and others. She is an award-winning author and certified instructor of Journal to the Self®. She now lives in Indiana with her husband, a survivor of a traumatic brain injury. You can learn more about Barbara at her website: http://www.barbarastahura.com. In the meantime, here is her interview.

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What is “Normal” for Family Caregivers after Brain Injury?

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Being a caregiver can be both an incredibly stressful and rewarding job. But when a family member – a spouse, son or daughter, parent or sibling – becomes the primary caregiver, there is an emotional component that is added to the physical aspect of giving care. No matter how much we try to be objective or distance ourselves to get the job done, caring for a parent, spouse, child or siblings stirs up many mixed emotions.

Many of us expect and willingly accept being caregivers when a family member is first injured or ill. As the person leaves the hospital or rehabilitation program, we are prepared to give additional help or supervision when our family member first comes home. But we expect it will be temporary – until the person recovers or regains strength – just as has happened in the past.

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Physical Dimension TBI Improvement

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Never seeing improvement day to day is discouraging, but eventually seeing and knowing improvement is motivating. Success is seen and experienced in the long term if you record improvement daily no matter how small. This will encourage a person psychologically.

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Journaling Helps after Traumatic Brain Injury

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A brain injury can affect so many aspects of a survivor’s and family’s life that it can feel overwhelming at times. So many caregivers and family members feel alone and confused as they struggle to know the “new person” who is their loved one. These feelings of isolation and loss are also common among survivors of brain injury – whether you are a civilian or a veteran.

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Brain Injury, Alcohol and the Holidays

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Alcohol flows freely during holidays with parties and celebrations, but for brain injury survivors, families, and caregivers, it can have unexpected effects. Janelle Breese Biagioni explores how moderation or avoidance of alcohol can help reduce the stress of holidays with practical tips for caregivers and persons with brain injury.

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