Brain and Healing by William Jarvis

ALL TBI SURVIVORS AND CARE GIVERS NEED TO KNOW that improvement is possible, even years later. It always amazes me the amount of healing that can take place in the...

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Can I be Objective and Have Empathy after my Brain Injury?

One thing that has confused me since my TBI is empathy. I want everyone to have it and forgive me when I'm rude, forgetful, and overwhelmed. More than anything, I...

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Magic as Therapy after Brain Injury

Being disabled is not fun! A car collision for me in 2000 resulted in a coma, fractured C1-C4 vertebrae, a Traumatic Brain Injury, and one and a half years...

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Why Bother with Families after Brain Injury?

Writing for families gets little support or recognition in clinical and academic circles. It’s time to rethink biases and disincentives that leave families uninformed and searching for information about brain...

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Finding Purpose In Being a Brain Injury Survivor by Mike Heikes

The autobiography of Brain Injury Survivor and five time cross country charity bicyclist Mike Heikes. Mike formed "helmets For Kids", giving away thousands of free helmets. It tells how Mike...

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The Grip of Anniversaries

As I write this, the calendar says July 5, 2013, but my mind is pulled back to July 5, 1998. That’s because my husband Alan suffered the massive heart attack...

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Janet Cromer Interviewed on Brain Injury Radio

This week I had the pleasure of being a guest of Kim Justus, host of the Recovery Now show, on Brain Injury Radio. Kim is a brain injury survivor and...

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Head Injury: Where the Rubber Meets the Road by Ron Harnett

My wheelbarrow tire suddenly goes flat. With the spring thaw, dirt and debris to be loaded on and carted around, not good timing. What to do? What turns out is a...

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Hi God, it’s me, David – After My Brain Injury! by David Grant

Since my accident, I’ve taken up an interest in nuclear physics. That alone is a bit of an oddity. Most of your Kids don’t realize that all the matter that...

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The Near Normal after Brain Injury

Four years ago, I survived two Mild Traumatic Brain Injuries, one from a car accident in which I was broadsided while idling at a stoplight. My driver’s side and curtain...

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Brain and Healing by William Jarvis

ALL TBI SURVIVORS AND CARE GIVERS NEED TO KNOW that improvement is possible, even years later. It always amazes me the amount of healing that can take place in the...

Read more »

PTSD and Your Children on the News

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As troops are returning home from deployments in Iraq, a regular feature on the evening news has become reunions with spouses, parents, and children. Because I live inNorth Carolinawhere there are multiple bases, I see this at least once a week – finally, some joy on the evening news in between the latest disaster, political campaign, or financial report. Especially touching are the reunions when a parent – still in camouflage uniforms – appears at school to surprise a child who has not seen mom or dad for many, many months or more than a year. It is impossible not to smile, and I admit to tearing up occasionally, at the incredible joy of this “parent and child reunion” to borrow a phrase from a Paul Simon song.

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Maintaining Structure and Routine during the Holidays after a Traumatic Brain Injury

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The Holiday Season, although typically merry and festive, brings added pressures to our daily routine. With shopping, increased food preparation, house guests, frequent visitors, financial stress, and more demands on time, the inevitable occurs; A change in routine.

Change, although it tends to be a good thing as it helps one become, too much change and in a short time span can produce negative results for Traumatic Brain Injury (TBI) Survivors. Too much change could potentially result in: back tracking on earlier progress that was made and/or getting out of a set regiment thus having to re-learn areas that were previously mastered. Having a daily routine helps one stay on track with set goals, stabilizes a set schedule, and provides a framework in which repetition for specific tasks or activities can successfully be accomplished. The need for a set routine does not magically disappear when the Holidays appear.

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Caregivers – Do Something Nice for Yourself this Holiday Season

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Caregiving is extremely taxing. People do it out of love and they want to take care of their loved one, but the strain and toll it takes on the caregiver’s life is real and should not be overlooked. I know we are raised to NOT be selfish, but sometimes that is exactly what we need to do. Carving out some time alone is often the only way to recharge your batteries. And, we know how exhausting the holiday season can be so as a caregiver, you may feel it even more so.

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Brain Injury – Surviving Holiday Stress

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For some people, the holidays can be an exciting time revolving around the hustle and bustle of baking, entertaining, welcoming out-of-town guests, shopping, and more. For others, the holidays can be a time of loneliness and isolation. Whether it is positive or not-so-positive, the holidays are usually a source of stress for all. For a survivor of a brain injury, however, the holidays can feel even more overwhelming and can lead to new daily challenges that can make not just the holiday season a struggle, but can also affect day-to-day living. The following tips can be useful for all individuals battling seasonal stressors, but can be especially good survival tips for those who have survived a brain injury (and their caregivers).

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Writing is a Courageous Act

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Picking up a pen and writing about ourselves in our journal takes courage—especially if we intend to tell the truth of our experience. It can be more than difficult to write about our not-so-proud moments. But when we do write, we learn about ourselves, process what we have experienced, and use what we learn as steppingstones to the future.

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Budgeting Grief at Christmas after Brain Injury

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We like to think of Christmas as a time that is rich with tradition and filled with joyful festivities. People look forward to spending the holidays with family and friends, exchanging gifts, indulging in delectable treats and reminiscing about the good old days. On the other hand, for many, it brings tremendous pressure to celebrate it in the way we always did or in the same way others do.

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Surround Yourself with Like-Minded People after Brain Injury

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One of the first things I learned as a writer was to surround myself with like-minded people. This meant that I needed to be around people who understood the creative process and who also held a passion to achieve great things with their work.

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Cognitive Dimension TBI Improvement

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A traumatic brain injury greatly affects the cognitive thought process. Every aspect of thought can be challenged, e.g., attention, memory, reasoning ability, language.

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Re-Developing Family Roles after a Traumatic Brain Injury

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According to Boeing, M., Barton, B., Zinsmeister, P., Brouwers, L. Trudel, T., Elias, E., and Weider, K. in their article Lifelong Living After TBI, the impact of a Traumatic Brain Injury (TBI) can change every aspect of family roles across the life continuum (2010). Change like the seasons is inevitable. Change either becomes an opportunity or a threat to how life is lived and how circumstances are experienced (Boeing, M., et. Al, 2010).

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Being Accountable after Brain Injury

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We have all been in situations where we did something that was careless or thoughtless and caused distress for others. An example would be bumping into a table and knocking off a treasured ornament, smashing it into a gazillion pieces. We feel foolish and may even say, “Oh my goodness, look what I’ve done. I am so sorry. That was completely my fault. Please let me replace it for you.” Don’t confuse this with self-blame – this is being accountable for one’s action and making amends or rectifying the situation.

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