Brain and Healing by William Jarvis

ALL TBI SURVIVORS AND CARE GIVERS NEED TO KNOW that improvement is possible, even years later. It always amazes me the amount of healing that can take place in the...

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Can I be Objective and Have Empathy after my Brain Injury?

One thing that has confused me since my TBI is empathy. I want everyone to have it and forgive me when I'm rude, forgetful, and overwhelmed. More than anything, I...

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Magic as Therapy after Brain Injury

Being disabled is not fun! A car collision for me in 2000 resulted in a coma, fractured C1-C4 vertebrae, a Traumatic Brain Injury, and one and a half years...

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Why Bother with Families after Brain Injury?

Writing for families gets little support or recognition in clinical and academic circles. It’s time to rethink biases and disincentives that leave families uninformed and searching for information about brain...

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Finding Purpose In Being a Brain Injury Survivor by Mike Heikes

The autobiography of Brain Injury Survivor and five time cross country charity bicyclist Mike Heikes. Mike formed "helmets For Kids", giving away thousands of free helmets. It tells how Mike...

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The Grip of Anniversaries

As I write this, the calendar says July 5, 2013, but my mind is pulled back to July 5, 1998. That’s because my husband Alan suffered the massive heart attack...

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Janet Cromer Interviewed on Brain Injury Radio

This week I had the pleasure of being a guest of Kim Justus, host of the Recovery Now show, on Brain Injury Radio. Kim is a brain injury survivor and...

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Head Injury: Where the Rubber Meets the Road by Ron Harnett

My wheelbarrow tire suddenly goes flat. With the spring thaw, dirt and debris to be loaded on and carted around, not good timing. What to do? What turns out is a...

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Hi God, it’s me, David – After My Brain Injury! by David Grant

Since my accident, I’ve taken up an interest in nuclear physics. That alone is a bit of an oddity. Most of your Kids don’t realize that all the matter that...

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The Near Normal after Brain Injury

Four years ago, I survived two Mild Traumatic Brain Injuries, one from a car accident in which I was broadsided while idling at a stoplight. My driver’s side and curtain...

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Brain and Healing by William Jarvis

ALL TBI SURVIVORS AND CARE GIVERS NEED TO KNOW that improvement is possible, even years later. It always amazes me the amount of healing that can take place in the...

Read more »

Blowing Leaves

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I have some very good friends in Mexico and a couple of them volunteered to help me learn the language, so I started my first Spanish lesson today. It was a simple lesson, just to learn the alphabet. It seemed to go well, I made notes and made up my mind that I am going to study hard so that I can communicate with my neighbors here in Mexico.

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Cognitive Rehab at Home

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Brain injury can affect many areas of the brain involved in thinking, learning, remembering. and communicating. Cognitive rehabilitation aims to restore those abilities as much as possible, or teach the survivor strategies to compensate in new ways.

Cognitive rehab usually starts in the hospital or out-patient setting. But that’s just the beginning. Healing and recovering from a brain injury can take a long time. Many people can continue to make progress in specific ways for months and years after a brain injury with ongoing treatment, motivation, and practice.

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Welcome from Marie

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Hi! My name is Marie Cooney, and I am very proud to have the opportunity to start blogging regularly for Lash and Associates Publishing. I have survived, not one, but two Traumatic Brain Injuries.

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Bereavement, Grieving and Mourning

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We use the words bereavement (or bereaved) and grieving and mourning interchangeably, as though they all mean the same thing. They don’t.

To be bereaved is to be “deprived of a close relation or friend through their death.” In other words, it is the event or “the call” ~ it is what has happened to you that caused you to lose someone or something.

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March Is Brain Injury Awareness Month

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March is Brain Injury Awareness Month and Lash and Associates has an ongoing commitment to create awareness about sports and concussions.

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All of the Above is True

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Have you noticed that living with brain injury sometimes involves contradictions and inconsistencies? My husband Alan had a severe anoxic brain injury following a cardiac arrest. When friends asked how Alan was doing in his recovery my answers often started with,” Well on one hand…”

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The Story of Your Life

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As a person with a brain injury, you have been hurt and traumatized by something most people haven’t experienced and can’t really understand. Whether your brain injury is the result of an accident, surgery, infection, military service, violence, stroke, medical emergency, or any other cause, you now must deal with a number of challenges you never imagined.

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The Long Haul

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My son Brian, a 20-year-old college sophomore, sustained a brain injury in a car accident in July of 1985. Brian decided to go to the beach at 2 a.m. with a friend, after drinking too many beers and smoking marijuana. In the pre-dawn hours, still miles from Ocean City, he fell asleep at the wheel.

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Brain Injury and Grief – Fact or Fiction?

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There are many experiences in life that cause us to grieve. Generally, we think grief results from someone’s death. Certainly, death is a cause for grief; however, it is not the only way to experience loss. Divorce, separation, transitional losses (e.g. moving to a new community), and developmental losses (e.g. children leaving home) are also ways in which we can experience loss

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Brain Injury Survivor Tips

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After brain injury, life is full of adjustments. It can be challenging, not just for the survivor, but also for those who know and care for the person.

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