Brain and Healing by William Jarvis

ALL TBI SURVIVORS AND CARE GIVERS NEED TO KNOW that improvement is possible, even years later. It always amazes me the amount of healing that can take place in the...

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Can I be Objective and Have Empathy after my Brain Injury?

One thing that has confused me since my TBI is empathy. I want everyone to have it and forgive me when I'm rude, forgetful, and overwhelmed. More than anything, I...

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Magic as Therapy after Brain Injury

Being disabled is not fun! A car collision for me in 2000 resulted in a coma, fractured C1-C4 vertebrae, a Traumatic Brain Injury, and one and a half years...

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Why Bother with Families after Brain Injury?

Writing for families gets little support or recognition in clinical and academic circles. It’s time to rethink biases and disincentives that leave families uninformed and searching for information about brain...

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Finding Purpose In Being a Brain Injury Survivor by Mike Heikes

The autobiography of Brain Injury Survivor and five time cross country charity bicyclist Mike Heikes. Mike formed "helmets For Kids", giving away thousands of free helmets. It tells how Mike...

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The Grip of Anniversaries

As I write this, the calendar says July 5, 2013, but my mind is pulled back to July 5, 1998. That’s because my husband Alan suffered the massive heart attack...

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Janet Cromer Interviewed on Brain Injury Radio

This week I had the pleasure of being a guest of Kim Justus, host of the Recovery Now show, on Brain Injury Radio. Kim is a brain injury survivor and...

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Head Injury: Where the Rubber Meets the Road by Ron Harnett

My wheelbarrow tire suddenly goes flat. With the spring thaw, dirt and debris to be loaded on and carted around, not good timing. What to do? What turns out is a...

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Hi God, it’s me, David – After My Brain Injury! by David Grant

Since my accident, I’ve taken up an interest in nuclear physics. That alone is a bit of an oddity. Most of your Kids don’t realize that all the matter that...

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The Near Normal after Brain Injury

Four years ago, I survived two Mild Traumatic Brain Injuries, one from a car accident in which I was broadsided while idling at a stoplight. My driver’s side and curtain...

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Brain and Healing by William Jarvis

ALL TBI SURVIVORS AND CARE GIVERS NEED TO KNOW that improvement is possible, even years later. It always amazes me the amount of healing that can take place in the...

Read more »

Traumatic Brain Injury and Concussion in Veterans

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Many veterans have undiagnosed brain injuries or concussions from blasts and explosions. Some soldiers have had multiple concussions. This free article lists the common symptoms of brain injury and gives tips for healing and managing symptoms. Veterans and soldiers with these symptoms should be evaluated for concussion and blast injury to receive early treatment and to help recovery.

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Overlooking Mild Traumatic Brain Injury Concussion

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Concussion is the most common type of traumatic brain injury in adults. Concussion symptoms can include headaches, dizziness, trouble sleeping and difficulty concentrating. Mild traumatic brain injury is a “hidden” condition because too often it is not diagnosed by medical professionals. Many individuals are unaware that their brain has been injured and do not see a doctor or go to an emergency department. Most symptoms are temporary but some adults have long term effects with post concussion syndrome.

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Blast Injuries and Concussions in Veterans

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Blasts and explosions are major causes of brain injuries in soldiers injured in Iraq and Afghanistan. Concussion or mild brain injury is often not diagnosed since there is no loss of consciousness and soldiers return to duty. Post traumatic stress disorders (PTSD) have been diagnosed among soldiers and veterans exposed to combat stress who have returned home.

The severity of a brain injury ranges from very minor concussion to extremely severe brain trauma. Service members are exposed to additional damage from the blast’s impact. They can be thrown or propelled by the blast, be burned and inhale toxic substances.

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Children with Brain Injury: Recovery and School

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Recovery from brain injury is a long process for families and schools. An injury to a child’s brain is a physical and emotional trauma. Changing symptoms – a neurocognitive stall – may appear over a year after the brain injury. Students have new cognitive challenges in school as the brain recovers and learning becomes more complex in school. Family training and education of teachers on TBI are essential to help children cope and learn at home and in school.

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Cost of Traumatic Brain Injury

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Treatment for traumatic brain injury can be costly for the child or adult who has been injured as well as the family. Hospital care, rehabilitation, therapies, medication, home care, equipment – all can be costly. These expenses are added to lost income of family members. The costs of care for traumatic brain injury, insurance limits, and limited community resources add to the stress of families.

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Physical and Mental Aging after a Brain Injury

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Survivors of traumatic brain injury worry about the effects of aging on cognition, depression, Alzheimer’s disease, and epilepsy. Aging is not a disease, but aging can compound the effects of brain trauma including memory, organization, and problem solving. Ten rules are given to help adults with TBI with the aging process.

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Families of Veterans with Mild Brain Injury

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Service members and veterans with undiagnosed brain injuries can have difficulty adjusting to family life after returning home. Repeated exposure to blasts increases the likelihood of concussion. Screening soldiers and veterans for concussion or mild brain injury after exposure to blasts and after coming home helps identify symptoms. Early treatment can help veterans cope with symptoms and assist recovery. Equally important is educating family members about mild brain injury.

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Students with Traumatic Brain Injury

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Students returning to school with traumatic brain injuries may have a variety of physical, cognitive, behavioral, social and emotional challenges. Recovery of function is typically enhanced through exposure to enriched environments like the education provided at schools. Just as schools promote learning, recovery after a brain injury is a re-learning process. This is why it is important to provide students with brain injuries access to appropriate supports and services by educators.

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Gathering Information When a Student Has a Brain Injury

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When a student has a traumatic brain injury (TBI), teachers, classmates, and school staff need information on how the brain injury has affected the child. Educators, students and parents often aren’t quite sure how to begin. The place to start is with information to help the educational team understand and meet the needs of this student in the classroom.

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Parents and Educators

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Parents know their child best – before and after the brain injury. This checklist for educators lists questions to ask parents to gather information on the physical, emotional, cognitive and behavioral effects of the TBI. These tips help parents and educators communicate more effectively to understand the educational needs of the student.

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