Brain and Healing by William Jarvis

ALL TBI SURVIVORS AND CARE GIVERS NEED TO KNOW that improvement is possible, even years later. It always amazes me the amount of healing that can take place in the...

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Can I be Objective and Have Empathy after my Brain Injury?

One thing that has confused me since my TBI is empathy. I want everyone to have it and forgive me when I'm rude, forgetful, and overwhelmed. More than anything, I...

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Magic as Therapy after Brain Injury

Being disabled is not fun! A car collision for me in 2000 resulted in a coma, fractured C1-C4 vertebrae, a Traumatic Brain Injury, and one and a half years...

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Why Bother with Families after Brain Injury?

Writing for families gets little support or recognition in clinical and academic circles. It’s time to rethink biases and disincentives that leave families uninformed and searching for information about brain...

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Finding Purpose In Being a Brain Injury Survivor by Mike Heikes

The autobiography of Brain Injury Survivor and five time cross country charity bicyclist Mike Heikes. Mike formed "helmets For Kids", giving away thousands of free helmets. It tells how Mike...

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The Grip of Anniversaries

As I write this, the calendar says July 5, 2013, but my mind is pulled back to July 5, 1998. That’s because my husband Alan suffered the massive heart attack...

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Janet Cromer Interviewed on Brain Injury Radio

This week I had the pleasure of being a guest of Kim Justus, host of the Recovery Now show, on Brain Injury Radio. Kim is a brain injury survivor and...

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Head Injury: Where the Rubber Meets the Road by Ron Harnett

My wheelbarrow tire suddenly goes flat. With the spring thaw, dirt and debris to be loaded on and carted around, not good timing. What to do? What turns out is a...

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Hi God, it’s me, David – After My Brain Injury! by David Grant

Since my accident, I’ve taken up an interest in nuclear physics. That alone is a bit of an oddity. Most of your Kids don’t realize that all the matter that...

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The Near Normal after Brain Injury

Four years ago, I survived two Mild Traumatic Brain Injuries, one from a car accident in which I was broadsided while idling at a stoplight. My driver’s side and curtain...

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Brain and Healing by William Jarvis

ALL TBI SURVIVORS AND CARE GIVERS NEED TO KNOW that improvement is possible, even years later. It always amazes me the amount of healing that can take place in the...

Read more »

Diagnosis of Brain Injury: FAQs

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Common questions about traumatic and acquired brain injury are answered in user friendly language for families, survivors and caregivers. Explains common terms of closed head injury, penetrating head injury, concussion, skull fracture, shaken baby syndrome, and second impact syndrome. Lists various consequences of traumatic brain injury (TBI) and gives examples of other types of acquired brain injuries.

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Managing Challenging Behavior after Brain Injury

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Identification and treatment of behavior challenges after acquired brain injury (ABI) have included behavioral modification programs, medications to control abnormal behaviors, token economies, and social reinforcement. Despite the widespread recognition of behavioral issues, today few resources exist for crisis hospitalization and treatment by mental health programs.

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I Have a What? Mild TBI

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Manual for adults and families has information on the symptoms, treatment and recovery after a mild traumatic brain injury (TBI) or concussion. Using clear language and explanations, readers learn about the physical, behavioral, cognitive and emotional changes that can occur after a mild brain injury. Tips for recovery help adults cope with the changes and monitor recovery

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Optimal Recovery after Brain Injury: FAQs

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As a survivor of a brain injury and a family member, John Richards and Marjorie Crigler discuss the meaning of recovery, the importance of family support, and give tips for rebuilding life after brain trauma. They tackle the tough questions of how families can help the survivor, whether faith makes a difference, what to expect when the survivor comes home, and how to figure out what’s next. They identify the intangible ingredients to brain injury recovery that can make a difference to the survivor and family.

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Communication in Children after Brain Injury: FAQs

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Changes in a child’s communication skills after traumatic brain injury often are unnoticed and undiagnosed. As long as the child is speaking, reading and writing, parents and educators often assume that communication has not been affected by a head trauma. This articles answers questions about how a brain injury can affect speech, language and communication in children. It alerts parents and educators for signs and symptoms at home and in the classroom.

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TBI Concussion in School Athletes: FAQs

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A mild brain injury, often called a concussion, is the most common brain injury in sports. Children and youth are injured every day at school on the playground, in physical education and in team sports. Everyone at school can help by learning to recognize the signs and symptoms of concussion or mild brain injury. This includes parents, teachers, school nurses, coaches, physicians, friends, and classmates. They can provide support at school, in the classroom, on the playing field to help the student recover and avoid another concussion.

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Assessment and Your Child’s Brain Injury: FAQs

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Assessment after traumatic brain injury is not restricted to professionals in hospitals and rehabilitation. Parents know their child before and after a traumatic brain injury better than anyone. Assessment is a method to help parents describe the effects of the brain injury on their child, communicate effectively with medical staff, and discuss educational needs of their child at school. Think of it as putting together a verbal snapshot of your child. Ask yourself, “What are the most important things for this person to know about my child?”

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My New Brain

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While in the US Army in Germany, Lori Williams sustained a severe traumatic brain injury that forced her medical retirement from the military. Not only did she have to adjust to the physical and cognitive changes caused by her injury, she also had to adjust to civilian life back in the states again. Her memoir takes the reader through her cognitive, physical, emotional, and spiritual recovery.

Making the transition to becoming a civilian again involved mourning the loss of her identity as a soldier. Her experience will resonate with service members and veterans today who have been injured.

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Traumatic Brain Injury and Special Education: FAQs

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Children with traumatic brain injury may need special help and support at school to learn in the classroom. The needs of students with TBI change over time so educating a student with a brain injury is complex and challenging. Parents can be effective educational advocates by learning about state and federal laws on special education including the category for traumatic brain injury. Resources for free information on educating students with brain injury and special education laws are identified.

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Making Connections after Brain Injury

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Social isolation and loss of friends is a common consequence of traumatic brain injury (TBI). Many folks would like to help an individual(s) by becoming a social peer mentor but don’t know how to get started and what’s involved. It means being a friend, a role model and a resource. A social peer mentor needs to know some basic information about TBI. This manual helps anyone who wants to be a social mentor to a person with a TBI get started.

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