Brain and Healing by William Jarvis

ALL TBI SURVIVORS AND CARE GIVERS NEED TO KNOW that improvement is possible, even years later. It always amazes me the amount of healing that can take place in the...

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Can I be Objective and Have Empathy after my Brain Injury?

One thing that has confused me since my TBI is empathy. I want everyone to have it and forgive me when I'm rude, forgetful, and overwhelmed. More than anything, I...

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Magic as Therapy after Brain Injury

Being disabled is not fun! A car collision for me in 2000 resulted in a coma, fractured C1-C4 vertebrae, a Traumatic Brain Injury, and one and a half years...

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Why Bother with Families after Brain Injury?

Writing for families gets little support or recognition in clinical and academic circles. It’s time to rethink biases and disincentives that leave families uninformed and searching for information about brain...

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Finding Purpose In Being a Brain Injury Survivor by Mike Heikes

The autobiography of Brain Injury Survivor and five time cross country charity bicyclist Mike Heikes. Mike formed "helmets For Kids", giving away thousands of free helmets. It tells how Mike...

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The Grip of Anniversaries

As I write this, the calendar says July 5, 2013, but my mind is pulled back to July 5, 1998. That’s because my husband Alan suffered the massive heart attack...

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Janet Cromer Interviewed on Brain Injury Radio

This week I had the pleasure of being a guest of Kim Justus, host of the Recovery Now show, on Brain Injury Radio. Kim is a brain injury survivor and...

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Head Injury: Where the Rubber Meets the Road by Ron Harnett

My wheelbarrow tire suddenly goes flat. With the spring thaw, dirt and debris to be loaded on and carted around, not good timing. What to do? What turns out is a...

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Hi God, it’s me, David – After My Brain Injury! by David Grant

Since my accident, I’ve taken up an interest in nuclear physics. That alone is a bit of an oddity. Most of your Kids don’t realize that all the matter that...

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The Near Normal after Brain Injury

Four years ago, I survived two Mild Traumatic Brain Injuries, one from a car accident in which I was broadsided while idling at a stoplight. My driver’s side and curtain...

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Brain and Healing by William Jarvis

ALL TBI SURVIVORS AND CARE GIVERS NEED TO KNOW that improvement is possible, even years later. It always amazes me the amount of healing that can take place in the...

Read more »

Cost of Traumatic Brain Injury

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Treatment for traumatic brain injury can be costly for the child or adult who has been injured as well as the family. Hospital care, rehabilitation, therapies, medication, home care, equipment – all can be costly. These expenses are added to lost income of family members. The costs of care for traumatic brain injury, insurance limits, and limited community resources add to the stress of families.

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Physical and Mental Aging after a Brain Injury

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Survivors of traumatic brain injury worry about the effects of aging on cognition, depression, Alzheimer’s disease, and epilepsy. Aging is not a disease, but aging can compound the effects of brain trauma including memory, organization, and problem solving. Ten rules are given to help adults with TBI with the aging process.

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Families of Veterans with Mild Brain Injury

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Service members and veterans with undiagnosed brain injuries can have difficulty adjusting to family life after returning home. Repeated exposure to blasts increases the likelihood of concussion. Screening soldiers and veterans for concussion or mild brain injury after exposure to blasts and after coming home helps identify symptoms. Early treatment can help veterans cope with symptoms and assist recovery. Equally important is educating family members about mild brain injury.

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Students with Traumatic Brain Injury

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Students returning to school with traumatic brain injuries may have a variety of physical, cognitive, behavioral, social and emotional challenges. Recovery of function is typically enhanced through exposure to enriched environments like the education provided at schools. Just as schools promote learning, recovery after a brain injury is a re-learning process. This is why it is important to provide students with brain injuries access to appropriate supports and services by educators.

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Gathering Information When a Student Has a Brain Injury

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When a student has a traumatic brain injury (TBI), teachers, classmates, and school staff need information on how the brain injury has affected the child. Educators, students and parents often aren’t quite sure how to begin. The place to start is with information to help the educational team understand and meet the needs of this student in the classroom.

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Parents and Educators

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Parents know their child best – before and after the brain injury. This checklist for educators lists questions to ask parents to gather information on the physical, emotional, cognitive and behavioral effects of the TBI. These tips help parents and educators communicate more effectively to understand the educational needs of the student.

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Assessment and Your Child’s Brain Injury

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Assessment of cognitive, physical, emotional, and behavioral effects after a child’s brain injury helps case managers, clinicians and educators develop plans for care and services. Assessment is necessary for everything from providing rehabilitation treatment to setting up home health care to developing a financial plan for life long care.

Parents must and should be part of the assessment team as they know their child best – before and after the brain injury. Assessment is the first step in planning treatment and setting goals.

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Traumatic Brain Injury in Students

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If you haven’t already had a child with traumatic brain injury (TBI) in your classes, chances are you will before you end your teaching career. Approximately 1 million children and adolescents receive a head injury each year. Of these injuries, 16,000 – 20,000 will be serious enough to cause lasting effects, and one in 500 will be severe enough to cause hospitalization. If the child’s injury requires hospitalization, it is likely that he or she will require special education services.

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Traumatic Brain Injury Rehabilitation

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John Richards never expected to be a brain injury survivor. As a rehabilitation professional, president of a brain injury residential program, and Board of Directors member of the Brain Injury Association of New Hampshire, he was a well known service provider and advocate for persons with acquired brain injuries. The day he was found unconscious next to his bicycle on the road changed all that.

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Prison Inmates with Brain Injuries

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Update on acquired brain injury among prison inmates describes limited treatment for prisoners with neurological issues and acquired brain injury. Many have unidentified brain injuries and head trauma despite histories of unconsciousness, concussions, hospital admissions and physical trauma or abuse.

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