Myths & Facts, When Your Child has a Brain Injury

Myths & Facts, When Your Child has a Brain Injury

Marilyn Lash, M.S.W.
Myths and facts about brain injury in children can confuse families and educators. Trauma to a child’s brain can interrupt and delay cognitive, physical, social, communicative and behavioral abilities. The full effects of a childhood injury are not always immediately visible as the child’s brain is still developing. Information on brain injury in children helps parents, educators, therapists and doctors correct common misunderstandings and change attitudes by giving accurate information about pediatric brain trauma.
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Full Description

Information separates common myths from facts about how a brain injury affects brain development, recovery patterns, and learning in children. Nine myths are corrected with factual information about injury severity, neurodevelopment, rehabilitation, intelligence and recovery. This tip card helps clinicians, educators and families understand the latent effects of childhood brain injury over time as the brain matures and new needs emerge at home and in school.

Details
Item M&F
Pages 8
Year Second edition, 2011

Authors

Marilyn Lash, M.S.W.

Ms Lash uses her social work experience and research in pediatric rehabilitation to develop sensitive and practical guides for families, educators, and professionals. Her specialty is helping families cope with the emotional impact of brain injury and developing strategies for negotiating the complex service system. Now President and Senior Editor of Lash and Associates Publishing/Training, she focuses on developing user friendly publications for families, educators, and clinicians.

Contents

This tip card helps families, educators, therapists and doctors...

  • correct common misunderstandings
  • change attitudes by giving accurate information about brain injury

Myths and facts about brain injury among children

Myth... All brain injuries are the same.

Myth... Physical recovery is a sign that the brain has healed.

Myth... A brain injury heals with time.

Myth... Younger children recover better than older children.

Myth... A mild brain injury has no consequences.

Myth... A severe brain injury means that the child will be permanently and totally disabled.

Myth... The brain injury can’t be that serious if the child came right home from the hospital.

Myth... “Normal” IQ scores after a brain injury mean the child will have no problems learning.

Myth... Professionals are always the final experts.

References

Excerpts

Sample excerpt. Preview only – please do not copy.

Myths and facts about brain injury among children

Myth... Physical recovery is a sign that the brain has healed.

Fact... Cognitive recovery is different than physical recovery.

Cognition is a term experts use to describe the “thinking” skills or abilities like reasoning, memory and attention. Changes in learning, memory and behavior are the most common long-term effects of brain injuries among youth. It is harder for people to understand that a child who looks “okay” physically may still have a disability.

Recovery of physical abilities like walking and speaking does not mean that the brain has healed. Broken bones and cuts heal with the growth of new skin and bone, but the brain does not grow new neurons or brain cells.

Myth... A brain injury heals with time.

Fact... It takes longer for all the effects of a brain injury to show up in children.

The brain of a child still is developing through adolescence. All the effects of a brain injury may not be known right away. Children are more active, school work becomes more complex, and responsibilities increase over time. The brain of a growing child is steadily challenged to do more complex thinking, communication and learning.

Over time, new difficulties may appear that are directly related to the brain injury. It is harder for people to connect an earlier brain injury with later difficulties with behavior and learning. For the child who has a brain injury, time reveals instead of heals.

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