Visual Perception after Brain Injury

Visual Perception after Brain Injury

Kimberly S. Hutchinson, Ph.D., and Lawrence S. Dilks, Ph.D.

Visual perceptual problems after a brain injury are common. This Tip Card, written by Kimberly S. Hutchinson, Ph.D., and Lawrence S. Dilks, Ph.D., taken from their two-volume set -- Cognitive Rehabilitation of Executive Functions -- focuses on visual perception -- what is seen in the environment and how it is given meaning. There are two parts to visual perception:

  1. vision and everything seen.
  2. brain interpretation and management of information.

Improving visual perceptual skills or learning new strategies to work around problems takes patience and practice in order to see changes and turn strategies into habits.

Kimberly Hutchinson, Ph.D. and Lawrence Dilks, Ph.D., have created a valuable tool. By using the tips contained in this Tip Card, the individual experiencing perception problems will experience improvement and caregivers/family members will be able to give assistance as needed.

Item: VISP
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Full Description

Visual Perception is how the brain translates information from the eyes and puts the information together with data from other senses. This combined data provides information about what is seen, where the person is, or both. Once the brain has processed visual information, it can be used for tasks like making decisions or guiding actions. Visual perception is important for activities likeā€¦

identifying faces.

getting dressed.

reading.

recognizing objects.

finding your way to the grocery store.

figuring out whether something is close or far away.

noticing movement.

depth perception (is an object flat or three-dimensional).

identifying locations.

Details
Item VISP

Authors

Kimberly S. Hutchinson, Ph.D.

She is a Clinical Psychologist with Counseling Services in Lake Charles, Louisiana and Physical Rehabilitation Services at Lake Charles Memorial Hospital. She graduated from Barry University, Villanova University, and Fielding Graduate University. Kim taught at Barry University and has a research interest in rehabilitation and is completing a fellowship in Neurocognitive Rehabilitation at Lake Charles Memorial Hospital.

Lawrence S. Dilks, Ph.D.

He is a Clinical Neuropsychologist who has a private practice with Counseling Services in Lake Charles Louisiana and serves as the head of the Department of Neuropsychology with the Physical Rehabilitation Service at Lake Charles Memorial Hospital. He graduated from Truman State University, Kansas State at Pittsburg and The University of Southern Mississippi. Larry served four years as an Army Clinical Psychologist. He taught at Northwestern and McNeese State Universities. In the past 37 years, Larry has focused on helping individuals overcome psychological and cognitive impairments with the primary goal of maintaining as much independence as possible.

Contents

What is Visual Perception? p.1

Brain Activities Involved p.1

Problems After Brain Injury p.2

Strategies to Compensate for Problems or Improve Visual/Spatial Abilities p.2

Conclusion p.3

References p.3

Excerpts

Visual perception helps us understand our environment based on what we see and how we give meaning to what we see. There are two parts to visual perception. The first part is vision and everything we see. The second part is how the brain interprets and manages all information. The brain translates information from our eyes and puts the information together with data from other senses. The combined data is used to give us information about what we see, where we are, or both. Once the brain has processed visual information, it can be used for tasks like making decisions or guiding actions.

Visual perceptual problems after a brain injury are common. Improving visual perceptual skills or learning new strategies to work around problems takes patience and practice. Daily practice improves the likelihood of seeing changes and turning the use of strategies into habits. Take breaks when needed to manage fatigue (feeling tired) and frustration. Remember to be supportive and encouraging of yourself and your loved ones during this time of transition and learning.

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