Concussion Education: In the student-athlete's neighborhood

Concussion Education: In the student-athlete's neighborhood

Phil Hossler, ATC
When any athlete sustains a sports concussion, sensitive, trained and compassionate neighbors are needed to monitor the athlete’s recovery. For student-athletes, this managing team or neighborhood includes coaches, athletic trainers, parents, physicians, teachers, school nurses and school psychologists along with concussion specialists. This tip card provides checklists and practical strategies on educating everyone on the signs and symptoms of concussion in student-athletes with tips for support and accommodations.
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Full Description

A concussion is a mild traumatic brain injury. Often times the term “head injury” is used, but it is far more accurate to use the term “brain injury” since the brain has been traumatized. This concussion tip card guides everyone from parents to school and athletic staff to recognize concussion symptoms. It explains how to provide the student-athlete with cognitive rest, emotional support, assistance and accommodations in school, and guidelines for safe return to play.
Details
Item CESN
Pages 8
Year 2011

Authors

Phil Hossler, MS, ATC

He is the certified athletic trainer at East Brunswick High School in East Brunswick, New Jersey and has authored 3 texts for high school athletic trainers, parents and athletes. His most recent publications on concussion and school sports are Getting A-Head of Concussion: Educating the student athlete’s neighborhood and Concussion Policy: A construction guide for schools . He has also developed a Player’s Contract with the Team Poster to encourage student athletes to promptly report concussion symptoms. Mr. Hossler has had 30 articles published in various professional, coaching and teaching magazines. He has written for, been featured in or been interviewed for over 85 magazine, newspaper, radio and television outlets on topics related to high school athletic health.

Phil Hossler is a member of four halls of fame, including the New Jersey Athletic Trainers’ Society, New Jersey Interscholastic Coaches Association, New Jersey State Interscholastic Athletic Association and the National Athletic Trainers’ Association.

Contents

This tip card helps...

  • physicians examine and treat athletes
  • parents understand changes at home
  • friends be aware of concussion symptoms
  • educators make classroom adjustments
  • school nurses oversee school programs
  • coaches recognize and refer
  • athletic trainers assess and monitor

Table of Contents

Who is in the Neighborhood?

Signs and Symptoms of Concussion

When Can I Return to Play?

Physicians in the Neighborhood

Parents in the Neighborhood

     Tips for caring for your child in the first 24 - 48 hours…

Friends in the Neighborhood

     Check any changes you might notice in your friend...

Teachers in the Neighborhood

     School tips for helping the student...

School Nurses in the Neighborhood

     Tips for school nurses…

Coaches in the Neighborhood

     Tips for coaches…

Athletic Trainers in the Neighborhood

     Tips for athletic trainers…

Conclusion

References

Excerpts

Sample excerpt. Preview only – please do not copy.

Who is in the Neighborhood?

Student-athletes share enthusiasm, motivation and dedication in sports. When any athlete sustains a sports concussion, sensitive, trained and compassionate neighbors are needed to monitor the athlete's recovery. For student-athletes, this managing team or neighborhood includes coaches, athletic trainers, parents, physicians, teachers, school nurses and school psychologists along with concussion specialists.

Parents in the Neighborhood

As a parent, you know your child better than anyone else in the neighborhood. Any injury to your child's head, face or jaw has the potential to be dangerous. Since the danger may not appear immediately, the first 24 hours after the injury are vital to determining how serious it may be.

Tips for caring for your child in the first 24 - 48 hours…

· Do not leave your child alone for long.

· Use only Tylenol or acetaminophen for headaches.

· Avoid excessive eating and drinking.

· Avoid bright, loud and noisy environments.

· Be very aware of negative changes; any sign or symptom that has gotten worse needs immediate medical attention.

· Mental and visual rest is as equally important as physical rest. Reduce the amount of reading and electronic devices activity for several days.

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