C.A.M.P. - Concussion and Assessment Management Portfolio

C.A.M.P. - Concussion and Assessment Management Portfolio

Phil Hossler, ATC
The C.A.M.P. provides information and tools to systematically monitor and assess concussions in student athletes. It helps health care providers and athletic staff document, manage, record and follow the student athleteís progress for a productive plan of care. It shows how to document concussion signs and symptoms, assess balance and vestibular parameters, view tests and results, record questions and answers, and produce a concussion portfolio.
Item: CAMP
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Full Description

The purpose of the Concussion Assessment & Management Portfolio (CAMP) is to provide a convenient multi-application and multi-discipline forum for those who render care to the concussed athlete. Having several examination and assessment options available can make the plan of care more productive and results can be viewed from different perspectives. The assessor can document signs, symptoms, tests given with results, and questions asked with answers. In addition, the assessor can produce an individualized portfolio to track progress and to share with the athleteís other healthcare providers as needed. The manual comes with a CD to print and customize all forms and tracking instruments.

Details
Item CAMP
ISBN# 978-1-931117-70-8
Pages 58 pages plus CD with PDF files for all forms
Year 2013

Authors

Phil Hossler, ATC has been a certified athletic trainer for nearly 40 years. He has authored four books, including two on concussion care, plus over 30 professional articles. He has contributed to a national associationís texts in four editions and has 7 copyrights of educational learning tools.

Hossler has been an athletic training officer on state and regional levels and has traveled four times to Europe and South America with Olympic level teams. He has received several Distinguished Athletic Trainer awards as well as induction into four halls of fame as an athletic trainer, including the prestigious National Athletic Trainersí Associationís Hall of Fame. Hossler has served as a consultant to four national corporations in the athletic health care industry.

Other publications by Hossler published by Lash and Associates include:

Concussion Education: In the student-athleteís neighborhood (2011)

Concussion Policy Guide: A Construction guide for Schools (2010)

Playerís Contract with the Team Poster (2010)

Sports Concussion Tool Kit for Athletic Trainers and Coaches (2011)

Concussion Tool Kit for Schools (2011)

Contents

Table of Contents

Introduction

About CAMP

Ch 1 - Neurocognitive Assessment

Ch 2 - Head History

Ch 3 - Concussion Assessment

Ch 4 - 7 + 7 Symptom Chart

Ch 5 - Balance Assessment

Ch 6 - Vestibular Assessment

Ch 7 - School Accommodations

Ch 8 - Post-Injury Neurocognitive Assessment

Ch 9 - Physician Clearance

Ch 10 - Return to Play Steps

Ch 11 - Evaluation Recording

Ch 12 - Physician's Clearance

Ch 13 - Coaches' Observation

Ch 14 - Parental Concussion Steps

Ch 15 - School Personnel Sign Off

Ch 16 - Parental Sign Off

Conclusions

References

Excerpts

CAMP Introduction

Fact: Concussions happen.

Fact: Sports have an inherent risk of injury.

Adherence to rules, sport specific techniques, good sportsmanship, physical conditioning, proper nutrition and rest may enhance an athlete's chance of avoiding injury or reducing an injury's severity. Despite this, athletes will be injured. Proper management of injuries when they occur is critical.

Now that we know that, let's go about the business of monitoring, assessing and managing the health of the concussed individual.

About CAMP

The purpose of the Concussion Assessment & Management Portfolio (CAMP) is to provide a convenient multi-application and multi-discipline forum for those who render care to the concussed athlete. Having several examination and assessment options available can make the plan of care more productive and results can be viewed from different perspectives. The assessor can document signs, symptoms, tests given with results, and questions asked with answers. In addition, the assessor can produce an individualized portfolio to track progress and to share with the athlete's other healthcare providers as needed.

Why should more than one assessment tool be used?

Utilization of more than one assessment tool provides the healthcare provider with a broader spectrum of evaluation instruments. In 2010, the American College of Sports Medicine concluded that multiple symptom scales and assessment tools are available with no single tool showing clear superiority. Many tools remain based more on expert opinion than rigorous scientific evaluation. A multifaceted approach to sports concussion is advised. The sports medicine practitioner must not rely on any one tool in managing concussion. Rather, the practitioner must be aware of the strengths and limitations of whichever method is chosen to incorporate into a concussion evaluation and management plan.

Conclusion

Findings suggest that various assessment methods and tools are currently being used, but clinicians must continue to implement a combination of methods and tools in order to comply with the National Athletic Trainers' Association position statement. To detect deteriorating signs and symptoms that may indicate a more serious head injury, the ATC should be able to recognize both the obvious signs (eg, fluctuating levels of consciousness, balance problems, memory and concentration difficulties) and the more common, self-reported symptoms (eg, headache, ringing in the ears, and nausea).

The ATC should document all pertinent information surrounding the concussive injury, including but not limited to:

(1) mechanism of injury;

(2) initial signs and symptoms;

(3) state of consciousness;

(4) findings on serial testing of symptoms and neuropsychological function and postural-stability tests (noting any deficits compared with baseline);

(5) instructions given to the athlete and/or parent;

(6) recommendations provided by the physician;

(7) date and time of the athlete's return to participation; and

(8) relevant information on the player's history of prior concussion and associated recovery pattern(s).

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