Supporting Survivors and Caregivers after Brain Injury: A program for psychosocial support

Supporting Survivors and Caregivers after Brain Injury: A program for psychosocial support

Patty van Belle-Kusse and Judith Zadoks

This workbook approaches Acquired Traumatic Brain Injury holistically because it affects every member of the family and any caregiver and/or therapist working with the individual. The unique method presented in the manual provides the means to develop skills, activities and other tools that promote the survivor regaining control over personal lifestyle. It focuses on how to support the survivior living at home, in a residential program, in a nursing home, or in an assisted living facility. The SABI Method provides insight into the change the brain has experienced, the changes in social networks, the perspective change, looking at life in a new way, and maximizing the survivor's quality of life.

It helps caregivers address the questions of:

  • How can I help the person with a brain injury sort out his life again?
  • What does she hope to achieve in the future and are her goals realistic?
  • How do I talk about these things with him?
  • How can I help care for her without taking over her life?

Many survivors and families talk about life before and after the brain injury. This workbook helps them work with caregivers to connect both these lives, regain control, and improve their lives.

The SABI program includes the person with a brain injury (the survivor), the family and caregivers in all aspects of care and support. Together, they work and function as a team.

Item: SABI
Price: $24.00 Market price: $35.00 save 31%
Quantity Add to wish list
31%

Full Description

The SABI program helps families, survivors and caregivers explore who the person is behind the brain injury. It is a step by step method for developing a personal profile, identifying key life events, examining the meaning of the diagnosis, describing abilities and limitations, looking at pre injury personal development, and identifying current lifestyle and coping strategies.

The SABI program discusses:

  • Changes in the survivor's brain
  • Changes in perspective and priorities for the survivor
  • Changes in social support and friends
  • New way of looking at life after brain injury
  • Striving for maximum quality of life.

The workbook is filled with personal examples using a variety of individuals, challenges, services and living situations. It helps the survivor, family and caregiver put life in perspective by exploring 12 life themes of:

  • Appearance
  • Health
  • Family/Relationships
  • Sexuality
  • Work
  • Recreation
  • Social contacts
  • Housing and housekeeping
  • Finances
  • Certainty about the future
  • Independence
  • Meaning in life.

The workbook comes with a CD with PDF files for all forms so they can be used many times as the person progresses, as family situations change, as new needs and challenges are identified, and as services and living arrangements are developed.

Details
Item SABI
ISBN# 1-931117-59-4; 9781931117593
Pages 126 pages plus CD with PDF files
Year 2011

Authors

Patty van Belle-Kusse

With a degree in Behavioral Psychology at the University of Leiden in the Netherlands, Ms van Belle-Kusse has become a specialist in the field of mental health care helping people with acquired brain injury. As director of the Charosa Consultancy Agency, she has accomplished numerous innovative developments in this area in association with co-author, Judith Zadoks. She is co-founder of the Netherlands Centre for Brain Injury.

Ms van Belle-Kusse regularly conducts workshops and implementation projects using the SABI method. She is intrinsically involved in organization and policy making in the Netherlands health and social service sectors for people with brain injury. She directs the regional Centre for Consultancy and Expertise in the Netherlands, which is a center for people with an intellectual/physical disability, behavioral problems and for people whose quality of life has been impaired. She is also President of the European Association for Mental Health in Intellectual Disability (EAMHID).

Patty van Belle-Kusse is the author of two books in the Dutch language on the function of the brain, potential brain injury and the consequences of brain injury, on living with brain injury, and on emotional processing after brain injury by the person with a brain injury as well as by the person's family.

Judith Zadoks

A graduate in Educational Sciences at the University of Groningen in the Netherlands, Ms Zadoks is a consultant in the health and social service sectors. She directs the Zadoks Consultancy Agency active in the health and social service sectors in the Netherlands, which through innovation and cooperation strives to improve the sector for people with special care needs. In the capacity of project leader, she has participated in numerous assisted living projects for people with brain injury and other innovative projects for people with complex care needs, such as people with minor intellectual disabilities with major behavioral problems.

Contents

Table of Contents

Introduction

Summary of Research

Chapter 1 Living with a Brain Injury

Implications of Acquired Brain Injury

Essentials of the SABI Method

The SABI Model Step by Step

Chapter 2 Exploration Phase: The Person Behind a Brain Injury

Introduction

Personal Profile

Key Life Events

Diagnosis

Abilities and Limitations

Pre-Injury Personal Development

Lifestyle

Coping Strategy

Chapter 3 Exploration Phase: Life in Perspective

Life Themes

Eliciting Information

Connection and Agreement

Chapter 4 Evolution Phase

Cycle of Evolution

Start (Reason)

Question Behind the Question

Plan

Do

Evaluate

Chapter 5 Frequently Asked Questions or FAQs

Eliciting Information

Working Toward Achieving a Goal

General

Appendix 1 The 12 Life Themes in Focus

Appearance

Health

Family/Relationships

Sexuality

Work

Recreation

Social Contacts

Housing and Housekeeping

Finances

Certainty about the Future

Independence

Meaning in Life

Appendix 2 Exploration Forms (Client File)

Section 1 Important Information

Section 2 Reports

Section 3 Exploration Phase

Section 4 Life in Perspective

Section 5 Evolution Phase

Bibliography

Excerpts

Sample excerpt. Preview only – please do not copy

Introduction

A Unique Method

A brain injury* affects not only the individual, but the entire family as well. The person with a brain injury may need help from caregivers over time. Caregivers will have many questions that need answers:

· How can I help the person with a brain injury to sort out his life again?

· What does she hope to achieve in the future and are her goals realistic?

· How do I talk about these things with him?

· How can I help care for her without taking over her life?

This workbook presents a unique program to help answer these questions. It describes an approach where the person with a brain injury works together with a caregiver to map out the past, present and future. The aim of this process is to help the person with a brain injury regain control over his life again.

This program has been applied in the Netherlands and Belgium by many healthcare and social service organizations. It has been used for people with mental and/or physical limitations. Staff in psychiatric hospitals, nursing homes and volunteer home caregivers have used this program successfully. Research reveals that people with brain injury and their caregivers respond very positively to this method.

Is there a need for a method specifically for people with brain injury?

There are many support models for people with mental or physical limitations or with psychiatric disorders. However, they do not answer the questions that people with acquired brain injury raise. The behavioral and cognitive changes that can occur after a brain injury are fundamentally different than those caused by other illnesses or disorders.

Brain injury requires a unique approach. People with brain injury have two lives: their pre-injury life and post-injury life. The challenge they face is how to connect both lives. With help from people with brain injury, their family and caregivers, we set out on a journey to develop a unique support method specifically for people with acquired brain injury. SABI* (known in the Netherlands and Belgium by the Dutch title ‘Hooi op je vork') is the distinctive result of our journey.

The SABI method considers…

· the change that the brain has undergone

· the change in perspective for the person with a brain injury

· the change in the social network

· a new way of looking at life with brain injury

· striving to the individual's maximum quality of life.

*Note: The term brain injury is used in this workbook to include all types of acquired brain injuries including those caused by trauma, blasts, tumors, infections, stroke, cardiac arrest and anoxia.

Sabi is also a Japanese word, which is used in the combination wabi sabi.

The two words together mean...live your life in knowing that everything will pass away, so accept the beauty that comes with age, when life is touched by time and is not perfect anymore.

Excerpt from

Chapter 3 Exploration Phase: Life in Perspective

The Exploration phase has two components: the person with a brain injury and his life. In this chapter, we will concentrate on the person with a brain injury's life. We will introduce twelve Life Themes that serve as a platform for discussion and provide a systematic approach for eliciting information about the person's life before and after the brain injury.

The working method with these Life Themes and the person's goals are explained within the context of the Exploration phase. To illustrate the theories of this phase, we will once again draw on case studies based on two people with a brain injury, Jane and Peter. We will explain possible ways of interrelating the information that has been elicited, with the aim of gaining a better understanding of the person's behavior in order to establish agreements and conventions.

Appendix 1 contains supplementary information on the twelve Life Themes and example questions and observations.

Life Themes

Why explore the different themes in the life of the person with a brain injury?

In this phase, the person with a brain injury and the caregiver explore together which aspects play a major role in the person's life. This is done by talking about a range of Life Themes and recording the information that surfaces. We work with Life Themes as a platform for discussion. They help us organize the information and elicit any aspirations of the person with a brain injury. This puts the person's life into perspective. The SABI method distinguishes twelve Life Themes:

· Appearance

· Health

· Family/Relationships

· Sexuality

· Social Contacts

· Work

· Finances

· Recreation

· Housing and Housekeeping

· Certainty about the Future

· Independence

· Meaning in Life

By exploring each Life Theme before and after the brain injury occurred and comparing the past with the present, what has changed in the person's life becomes clearer. This helps give the individual a perspective about the future. This also helps the person's social network understand him better. Information about the past can provide a fundamental key to understanding the present, as the following example illustrates.

Who provides information?

Information on the various Life Themes is provided by the person with a brain injury. Only if the person consents is information gathered from someone in the social network. Information from others can contribute to putting the person with a brain injury's life into clearer perspective. The information exchange allows all parties concerned to gain new insights. The other person providing information can be the person with a brain injury's partner or parent, a professional caregiver, or both if they both play a role in the person's life. Whoever the person is, it is important that the person with a brain injury trusts who is providing information. The person's file can also provide valuable information, particularly about the person's past.

Monique says that she used to be good with money. She was very proud of never being in the red. She adds that never being in the red is still important to her.

Her caregivers observe that Monique wants to buy expensive things, which they find awkward because they regularly have to tell her that she cannot buy things because she doesn't have the money.

Based on pre-injury information, Monique and her caregiver discuss the current situation and learn that because of her brain injury, Monique no longer understands the value of money. Because Monique considers it important to manage her finances properly, she and her caregiver make an overview of Monique's financial situation in a way that Monique is able to understand. With support from her caregiver, she is able to keep her financial situation in perspective and manage her own finances.

Send to friend

: *
: *
: *
Type the characters you see in the picture. (If you do not see any picture here, please enable images in your web browser options and refresh this page):