Advocacy: For brain injury services

Advocacy: For brain injury services

Janelle Breese Biagioni
This tip card helps TBI survivors, family members and professionals understand the definition of advocate, advocacy, grassroots lobbying and lobbying. It explains the roles of the self-advocate, informal advocate, and advocate with tips on how to execute these roles using the who, what, where, when and how of advocacy.
Item: ADVO
Price: $1.00 Market price: $2.50 save 60%
Quantity Add to wish list
60%

Full Description

Advocacy is providing factual, nonpartisan information on an issue with the public or a legislator without mentioning a specific bill or asking them to vote in a certain way. It is a strategy that can be effective for educating people about brain injury, ensuring that services and programs best fit the survivor’s needs and for developing partnerships.

An advocate is a person who pleads the case of another or argues for a cause. The same definition applies if you take on the role of self-advocate to plead your own case, which is speaking up and speaking out for your rights.

This tip card explains the goals of advocacy and describes in detail the roles and responsibilities of advocates. It also lists tips and strategies for each type of advocate.
Details
Item ADVO
Pages 8
Year 2011

Authors

Janelle Breese Biagioni

Janelle is a published author, national speaker and a long-standing advocate for families and survivors of brain injury. Her book, A Change of Mind by Lash and Associates Publishing/Training, is her family’s journey through brain injury after her husband sustained severe head trauma from a motorcycle accident. Other work includes non-fiction books, articles and short stories on bereavement and coping strategies for families affected by catastrophic injury. Janelle offers workshops and presentations on Grief and Loss and has appeared on television and radio to promote her work. She is editor of Headline, a quarterly publication serving the brain injury community in British Columbia and throughout Canada.

Janelle is currently working on her next book, The Mourning Sun: Hope for Those Living with Loss. This inspiring book offers individuals and families in crisis a compelling testimony blended with practical, yet revolutionary guidance to empower them through the journey of grief.

Contents

Advocacy: For brain injury services

What is Advocacy?

Goals of Advocacy

Advocate

Self-advocate

Grassroots lobbying

Lobbying

Roles and Responsibilities of an Advocate

Self-Advocate

Tips for the self-advocate

Informal Advocate

Tips for the informal advocate

Advocate

Tips for the advocate

Who, What, Where, When and How of Advocacy

Who

What

Where

When

How

Conclusion

Suggested Readings and Links

References

Excerpts

Sample excerpt. Preview only – please do not copy

What is Advocacy

Advocacy is providing factual, nonpartisan information on an issue with the public or a legislator without mentioning a specific bill or asking for a vote in a certain way and is different from arguing. It is a strategy that can be effective for educating people about brain injury, ensuring that services and programs best fit the survivor's needs and for developing partnerships.

An advocate is a person who pleads the case of another or argues for a cause. The same definition applies if you take on the role of self-advocate to plead your own case. Self-advocacy involves speaking up and speaking out for your rights.

Roles and Responsibilities of an Advocate

An advocate must:

· not have a conflict of interest

· be committed to respecting the privacy and confidentiality of the person being represented

· be knowledgeable on the issue for representation

· understand what is required by law and what isn't

Tips for the advocate…

  • Include case studies that demonstrate the need in the community. The power is in the personal story. Decision-makers will remember the person, not necessarily the agency.
  • Use plain simple language and avoid complex data, especially when appealing to the grassroots population to support a cause. It is important they are able to relay your information confidently so the material needs to be easily understood by them and the audience.

Send to friend

: *
: *
: *