The Young Child: Myths and Facts about Brain Injury

The Young Child: Myths and Facts about Brain Injury

Carole Wedel Sellars, Ph.D., CCC and Candace Hill Vegter, M.A., CCC
Traumatic brain injury in children affects them differently than adults. The brains of infants, toddlers and preschoolers are especially vulnerable to a traumatic injury as they are in early stages development and maturation. This tip card helps families, educators, and clinicians understand the possible impact of brain trauma on brain development in very young children by correcting common myths.
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Full Description

Traumatic brain injury in children has special consequences as the brain is sill developing. Twelve myths about brain trauma in young children are corrected with factual information on severity of injuries, neurodevelopment, rehabilitation, therapy, parental support, thinking and memory, and avoidance repeated injuries. This tip card is especially helpful for communicating with child care providers, day care programs, preschool programs and educators.

Details
Item TYC
Pages 8
Year Second edition, 2011

Contents

This tip card helps families, educators, nurses, therapists and doctors...

  • understand childhood development
  • guide parents after an injury
  • correct common misunderstandings

Early Brain Development

Myth… It isn’t a problem when a baby or toddler’s brain is injured, because the uninjured brain will take over for the injured part.

Myth… When a baby or toddler falls, or is in an accident and loses consciousness, the injury to the brain is so slight that there will be a full recovery.

Myth… This will never happen again.

Myth… Very young children are too young to benefit from rehabilitation.

Myth… Therapy just seems like play to a child.

Myth… It is best for parents to stay away from therapy so the child doesn’t cry.

Myth… Babies and toddlers are too young to work on their thinking and memory.

Myth… They are too young to get therapy and educational support from the local school.

Myth… Telling people about a brain injury early in the child’s life will result in the child being labeled or put in the wrong educational category.

Myth… Babies who are shaken and receive a brain injury will eventually recover and be normal.

Myth… Playful tossing and catching a baby in the air is such fun for the child that it must be harmless.

Myth… It’s too hard to protect young children from brain injury.

References

Excerpts

Sample excerpt. Preview only – please do not copy.

Early Brain Development

This tip card corrects common misperceptions about brain injury in the very young child. It helps people understand that these children often need professional care and their parents need guidance and support.

Myth… It isn’t a problem when a baby or toddler’s brain is injured, because the uninjured brain will take over for the injured part.

Fact… The very young brain is soft and more vulnerable to tearing, bleeding and swelling.

A large part of the brain can be affected in babies, toddlers and preschoolers with serious brain injuries. This results in the less “uninjured part” to take over.

Myth… When a baby or toddler falls or is in an accident and loses consciousness, the injury to the brain is so slight that there will be a full recovery.

Fact... Babies and young children have not fully developed their thinking, memory and judgment skills.

An injury can interrupt or delay this development. It is important to monitor the child’s development closely and track progress after a brain injury.

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