Providing Services for Wounded Warriors

Providing Services for Wounded Warriors

Helaine Bilos, C.C.M. and Marilyn Lash, M.S.W.

As wounded veterans and service members return home, community agencies will be providing services for survivors of traumatic brain injury (TBI) and post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD). This tip card prepares staff of community agencies to prepare for initial meetings with wounded warriors and family, gather information, identify pitfalls and barriers to services, and to be aware of cognitive issues with TBI and PTSD.

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Full Description

Wounded warriors are returning to their homes and communities. Their needs for services and support will vary widely. Their injuries are different than those seen in other wars, because the “weapons” are blasts, improvised explosive devices, chemicals and rocket propelled grenades. Service providers in the community face new challenges in treating wounded warriors. In preparation for their return, many providers in local communities are training staff, identifying resources, and developing veteran centric services.

This tip card discusses the importance of understanding the military culture, preparing for the first meeting, and provides an overview of challenges due to traumatic brain injury.

Details
Item PSWW
Pages 8
Year 2012

Authors

Helaine, Bilos, C.C.M.

Neuro Community Care, LLC founder and president, Helaine Bilos, has over 20 years experience providing support and advocacy for individuals with neurological injury and illness, including traumatic brain injury (TBI), in both managed care and community based settings. Her passion and knowledge enable her to not only provide support and services to the survivor of TBI, but to their families as well. Ms. Bilos has long believed that home/community based support is essential and ultimately provides the most cost effective service.

Marilyn Lash, M.S.W.

As President of Lash and Associates, Ms Lash has over 35 years of experience working with persons with disabilities and their families in medical, rehabilitation, educational and vocational settings. Her primary focus is supporting families and developing community programs along with user-friendly publications for families, educators, and clinicians. She speaks often and conducts workshops on the emotional trauma of families caring for wounded service members and veterans.

She is a former Chair of the Board for the Brain Injury Association of North Carolina and former Chair of the Brain Injury Advisory Council for North Carolina. She continues to share her insights as a keynote speaker at many brain injury conferences.

Contents

Introduction

Before you Meet

  • Military culture
  • Reading records
  • Tips on using information from records…

First Meeting

  • Tips on the first meeting…
  • Get everyone’s perspective
  • Tips on communicating…

Brain Injury Overview

  • Insight and self awareness
  • Memoery
  • Attention
  • Follow-through or task completion
  • Initiation
  • Egocentric
  • Judgment
  • Emotions
  • Social skills

What’s Next?

Excerpts

Traumatic brain injury and post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) are the signature wounds of the wars in Iraq and Afghanistan. Some symptoms are immediately apparent, others will emerge over time. Service providers face new challenges in treating wounded warriors. In preparation for their return, many providers in local communities are training staff, identifying resources, and developing veteran centric services.

Before you Meet

  • Military culture

It’s important to understand military culture to appreciate the unique commitment made by service members and their families to our country. These recent conflicts have crossed all branches of the military as well as the National Guard and Reserves. Each branch has its own identity, code of conduct, culture, abbreviations and titles.

Tips on learning about military culture…

  • Use the web to learn about the branch of service, e.g., army, navy, marine, national guard.
  • Identify rank, e.g., private, sergeant, captain, etc.
  • Know the person’s deployment history, e.g., number and length, sites, duties, etc.

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